Beginners Guide to Canning Food

Take a look at our guide to canning food, and preserve your summer bounty to enjoy in the months to come.


| July/August 2011



Canned Green Beans, Corn, and More

While canning can be intimidating, you, too, can fill your pantry with colorful, flavorful food you’ve grown yourself.

iStockphoto.com/YinYang

Cooking with vegetables fresh from my little garden brought me so much joy. Summer’s end was fast approaching, however, and the rewards of the summer’s hard work would end with the first cold snap. But did it have to? Why should I spend the winter using inferior canned tomatoes when I could enjoy my own heirlooms? Canning was the answer, and a guide to canning food would be very helpful for all undertaking this pursuit.

The prospect of home canning can be intimidating. I wish I could say I learned as a child at my grandmother’s side. The real story is that I learned alone with a shiny new boiling water canner, a “Ball Blue Book,” and the Internet. I was shocked at my success, but the fact is so many resources are out there for the uninitiated that anyone can tread fearlessly into home canning. 

Worth the bother

People choose home canning for many reasons. Memories of families getting together when their favorite fruit ripened and working in a steamy kitchen are enough to bring some folks back year after year. Others seek to reap the fruit of their labors long out of season, every jar of pickles stretching summer’s bounty a little further. Many appreciate that home canning is environmentally friendly in a tangible way: glass jars can be reused for years (or in my home, repurposed as drinking glasses), a bumper crop that would spoil before it can be consumed doesn’t go to waste, peels become compost, and fuel is not used to transport goods from farm to factory to table.

A parent would be hard pressed to find a better way to encourage environmental stewardship and self-sufficiency in a child. Choosing and preparing the produce yourself gives you control over the use of pesticides, sodium, sugars or potential allergens. Still others choose to home can to provide healthy food for their families. Homegrown vegetables are higher in nutrients than their commercially grown counterparts, and home canning means nutritious vegetables can be preserved at the height of their freshness without chemical preservatives.

Kim Krapcha of Oschner Hospital in New Orleans says, “With home canning you can preserve the foods at their peak ripeness. This means vitamins and minerals are at their highest concentration, which gives the home canner the best, most nutritious food available. Home gardeners often use fewer pesticides – if they even use them at all. This translates to far fewer harmful chemicals being trapped in canned foods and becoming a health hazard. Chemical preservatives aren’t used in home canning, which means foods retain their natural flavors, textures and nutritional value.”  

Getting started

Home canning is a good idea for so many reasons, the only real question is how to go about it?

Toni
12/4/2015 1:24:13 PM

Thanks so much for starting with an easy recipe for us timid beginners. How many jars (and what size) will I need for 3 lbs of apples... and will the 3 lbs of apples make just the 3 cups of juice, or what's to be done with the rest? Thanks and Merry Christmas!!


Toni
12/4/2015 1:23:29 PM

Thanks so much for starting with an easy recipe for us timid beginners. How many jars (and what size) will I need for 3 lbs of apples... and will the 3 lbs of apples make just the 3 cups of juice, or what's to be done with the rest? Thanks and Merry Christmas!!


JANICE WAGNER
4/6/2013 3:56:21 AM

There are reusable lids: Tattler. They're plastic flats with a rubber gasket. They cost more than the disposable metal ones, but when you can use them over and over (and over and over.....) they are cost effective. (Use the metal ones on jars that you're giving as gifts.) You still need the metal rings, but I've had the same success rate with sealing as I've had with the metal flats.


Jenifer Wilde
3/30/2013 4:46:07 PM

You can always get your pressure cooker "tested" at any Extension Office!


Joe S.
7/3/2011 4:52:47 PM

My wife and I can meat now. We get chicken quarters and put 2 thighs and 2 legs in a jar and get 7 jars filled like that, then we put them in our pressure canner. It works great and we got meat to last for years. She cuts up boneless chicken breast meat into chunks and fill the jars also. It is really satisfying to see the fruits of our labors when we are done. We canned pork also and hamburger. You have to brown the burger 1st and then fill the jars and leave about an inch of space. Then you fill with water to take up the space with the same amount of spacing from the top. It is great the way it works. My wife is so smart in researching ways and types of foods we can, can.






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