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The Old Farmer's Almanac 2013 Weather Predictions: Mild But Varied

11/20/2012 4:35:00 PM

Tags: weather predictions, temperature, seasons, old farmers almanac, almanac predictions

 

A photo of the author, Caleb ReganHere we are in late November, and it sure seems like it should be cooler. We experienced temperatures higher than I can ever remember last winter. In fact, records were broken across the country! Yet at this time last year, temperatures were lower than they are today. With so much uncertainty in my mind, I was excited and curious to flip through the pages of The 2013 Old Farmer’s Almanac and find out what we are in for in terms of 2013 weather predictions, particularly winter weather forecast 2013 predictions.

Despite what the current conditions in Kansas suggest, The Old Farmer’s Almanac tells me it will indeed be a little cooler this winter than last. The 2013 Almanac indicates that throughout rural America, folks can expect lower-than-normal temperatures this winter from the East Coast westward to a line from the Dakotas to Texas. West of that line, except for portions of the Desert Southwest, temperatures will actually be warmer than those of the 2011-2012 winter.

2013 Winter Weather Prediction From The Old Farmer's Almanac
 

2013 Weather Predictions From The Old Farmer's AlmanacIn terms of winter snowfall, the Almanac’s forecast is a split decision: “Snowfall will be above normal in a swathe from the Carolinas to West Texas and within a hundred miles or so of the Great Salt Lake; it will be near or below normal elsewhere.” Snow in the South and in much of Oklahoma and central Texas! The good news is that the Almanac believes that there will be enough precipitation (rain and snow) that the areas hit hard by drought conditions last year may see some relief.

Spring will bring welcome rain, too, according to the Almanac.

“Rainfall will be above normal from the Carolinas southward through Florida, from the Ohio Valley southwestward through Texas, and from the Upper Midwest westward into the Dakotas; it will be near or below normal elsewhere.”

Florida stands to benefit particularly. The Old Farmer’s Almanac says the Sunshine State will experience a much rainier season than normal – easing its drought conditions – while Georgia will continue to experience dryer-than-normal conditions.

Moving into the summer, we can expect summer temperatures to be higher than normal along the Atlantic and Pacific coasts and in the Ohio Valley, but cooler than normal elsewhere.

2013 Summer Weather Prediction From The Old Farmer's Almanac
 

For a Kansas guy like me, the prediction of cooler summer temperatures is music to the ears; however, taking a look at these two maps and flipping through the Almanac pages, it occurred to me that my part of the country might experience below-average rainfall, which is not.

Our grandpas and uncles were always worried about getting enough rain, and very little has changed on that front. No matter what slice of the countryside you call home, hopefully Mother Earth will be kind and you can make the most of whatever weather you experience in 2013.


Caleb Regan and his wife, Gwen, live in rural Douglas County, Kansas, where they enjoy hunting, fishing, and raising and growing as much of their own food as they can. Caleb can’t imagine a better scenario than getting to work on a rural lifestyle magazine as a profession, and then living that same lifestyle right in the heartland of America. Connect with him on .



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Post a comment below.

 

Eddie Reese
8/16/2013 11:39:44 AM
Interesting to see what the Almamac had to say about my upcoming winter. I live in NE Oklahoma now. I saw the late spring coming because of several indicators; two being the very blooming of forsythia and redbud trees. Both were a month late this year. So with our unusual cool summer Only hit 100 twice so far) and more rain than usual I was looking at a more normal winter. Which is to say colder and wetter than we have had in the last two winters. We'll see. I can't help but watch the plants and animals and weather and use those indicators to predict weather and then plan accordingly.

Meenew Parker
4/28/2013 2:40:50 PM
To know the weather is to know the plant animals and insects.If you want to know about the summer season or winter season here is your first clue.Watch the bees build there hives if they are high or if they are low .High going to be a cold winter, low a warm winter and if they are looking to get into your home or barn they are hiding from a seasonal climate change to hot or to cold they are seeking protection. Now for the plants and trees, moss always grows on the north side of the tree find it and look at the pattern of growth. Should the moss be high arounde the north side of the tree it is self protection for a bad winter,if the pattern is peeked it will be bitter cold.If the pattern is variable up and down then a warm cold pattern is in store for the winter.Watch the squirls gather there food patter if early in the fall they are telling you it is going to be a ling cold winter.The beavers will build there homes higher and away from stream flow if winter is going to be bad in order to stay dry and warm.The plants, flowers, and suckh,if they bub or bloom early you may get two harvests,and it they last bloom is in early fall winter is going to come soon. So there you have it falks follow the signs, The Founding Fathers of The United States Chief Joseph, Sitting Bull, Geronimo, Red Cloud new of how to make the land work for them and them for the land. The Native American People were migratory and they listened to the animals and the plants to now when to plant and when to harvest and when winter was coming they followed the signs. This is what we must do teach our children to listent to the signs given by mother nature and it will quide us.The only draw back is the D.O.D .and the use of HAARP that when turend on will change the weather pattern for the US or perticular areas of transmission location and interest.Stay informed and don't beleave what the news tells us of weather perditions unless they are being controlled by climate interferance manipulators.Do you reasearch people and stay informed and educated.

Meenew Parker
4/28/2013 1:47:22 PM
They say Maine will be Dry n Cool well I gues they are going to be wrong again for this year.The plants are tellin a different story.Nature has a way of telling a story all its own the animals can predict the weather as the plants tell the story. What we are seeing is a dry comfortable 75 to 85 and cool nights 55 60.Perfect weather low electric bill no need for airconditioners minimal fan usage.Oh and the bugs like black flies are going to be minimal sceetos too.Winter was snow melt snow melt warm cold warmer colder,well you get it one day 45 next day 50 next day 15.I winter melay interupted the cycle of insect propogation.We have seen minimal spring animal births.Deer mostly bucks and does no fawns.The robins came in end of February and we already have cardinal and bluegays and have seen oreals.The squirl population is down, the wild turckys are abundant they are everywhere.The beavers have been up and out since early March and are seen crossing the narrows to get to the a stream like pond.The moose have been seen out and about farm land roadsides just standing there a da, checking out the humans passin buy still no site of and offspring.Fishing season going to be fantastic the waters are filled with fish a good winter for spawning.So there you have the skinny on the summer season for Maine.Oh and we are ging to have a Indian summer here in Maine this year I mean a real one It will be warmer than usual going into fall for a nice long while nice to have extra time for winter hunkerin down and batten the hatches to stay warm for the 4 month winter season, thats right folks 4 months we have a mudin month sometimes.

Robyn Dolan
11/29/2012 4:16:40 PM
Well, you burst my bubble. We have been having a delightfully warm autumn here in No. AZ, but actually hoping for some snow this winter. I'm with Dave, in that I don't have to shovel out. Feeding the animals is a little tough, though, when there's a couple feet on the ground. Guess I better get prepared with a sled for the hay...hope we all get the moisture we need this winter!

Mary Carton
11/22/2012 4:31:03 AM
Two predictions for my area of Alabama. Both say we are going to get more snow! Most of the time it's freezing rain and ice instead of snow. We do need the moisture also.

HANK WILL
11/21/2012 10:13:41 PM
We're so short on subsoil moisture here in east central Kansas, Dave. I hope we get some this winter or spring pastures will be in a tough place, not to mention winter wheat.

NEBRASKA DAVE
11/21/2012 4:11:11 PM
Caleb, I hope Old Farmer's Almanac is right about the extra moisture this winter. I don't think we here in Nebraska could weather (yes a pun) another dry summer like last year. We made it through with mixed results. Some crops were good and others not so good but over all it wasn't a bad year considering. I'm ready for what ever Winter may bring. Of course I don't have to go to work every day so I can kick back with a nice hot cup of coffee and watch through my front window all the others shoveling their way out to get to work. :0) Have a great day in warm Kansas.



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