Pond Renovation Part 3: Installing the Overflow Pipe and Final Grading

Reader Contribution by Hank Will and Editor-In-Chief
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<a title=”Read part one of this pond renovation series here.” href=”/daily-commute/pond-renovation-part-1-determining-the-need.aspx?blogid=184″>Read part one of this pond renovation series here.</a>
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<a title=”Read Part two of this pond renovation series here.” href=”/daily-commute/pond-renovation-part-2-removing-trees-and-drain.aspx?blogid=184″>Read Part two of this pond renovation series here.</a>&nbsp;</p>
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<p>&nbsp;Day three of this pond renovation project began with the installation of the new plastic overflow pipe. This 8-inch diameter pipe is smooth and will flow more water than the old and larger diameter corrugated pipe system. Installing the pipe was as easy as dozing out a groove in the top of the dam at the correct elevation and angle, setting the pipe, and carefully packing it into place. A water-stopping collar was also installed around the pipe on the pond side of the dam.</p>
<p>It didn&rsquo;t take too long after installing the pipe to get the new spillway grading completed and to spread topsoil over the dam&rsquo;s surface. The topsoil will give the grass seed (soon to be planted) a fighting chance to produce a soil-holding stand of turf. I don&rsquo;t know when I will get to it, but I will report on the grass planting when it happens.</p>
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<p>Now all we have to do is wait patiently for the renovated pond&rsquo;s level to increase. It is moving up by inches per day at the moment, but it would come up rapidly with a single spring rainstorm.</p>
<p>I will report on constructing a new pond from scratch next week. Ironically, the new pond&rsquo;s cost will be lower than the pond renovation, but it won&rsquo;t be as tricky to accomplish.</p>
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<a href=”http://www.grit.com/biographies/oscar-h-will” target=_self>Hank Will</a>
<em> raises hair sheep, heritage cattle and many varieties of open-pollinated corn with his wife, Karen, on their rural Osage County, Kansas farm. His home life is a perfect complement to his professional life as editor in chief at GRIT and Capper’s Farmer magazines. Connect with him on </em>
<a title=Google+ href=”https://plus.google.com/u/0/117459637128204205101/posts” target=_blank rel=author>Google+</a>.</p>

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