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Where, on a kale plant, are the seeds?

5/18/2012 12:42:07 PM

Tags: where are the seeds on a kale plant, kale seeds, how do I save kale seeds, kale seed pods, does kale flower, kale bolting, S.M.R. Saia

A photo of Shannon SaiaI mentioned a few posts back that I was letting last year’s kale bolt this spring, in hopes of figuring out where the seeds develop. When I wrote that, I think I kind of had an idea that I would be picking the tiny black seeds out of the little yellow flowers with tweezers. I examined the flowers again and again, and I could not for the life of me figure out where those seeds were.  

But then yesterday, I was outside, examining my kale forest, which has grown gangly and unruly. The stalks keep getting longer and longer, pushing out more and more little yellow flowers as they grow up, and leaving behind what looks like a green porcupine…and that’s when it hit me. Those long, slim, pointy green things that I’ve been staring dumbly at for days now are seed pods! I pulled one off and slit it open, and though the seeds were still in development, they were pale green and soft, they are, nonetheless (going to be) seeds.  

Check it out! Who knew?????  

  kale seed pods 

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My first novel, Big Work, is available as an e-book on Amazon, Smashwords and B&N.com. I am expecting the print version to be available in the next two weeks. For more information visit my website



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Post a comment below.

 

Roland Small
6/18/2012 1:30:57 PM
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Coret OtheCountry
6/5/2012 2:12:54 AM
Yes. Also the same on turnips.- Oh! Oops! I didn't see Vanessa's post! James, the pods will turn yellowish and dry, to some degree, depending upon where you live. My veggie garden has volunteer turnips (greens) all year long... Oh, and lettuces, too. My kind of garden!

Vanessa Justice
6/1/2012 5:00:11 PM
Turnips and radishes do the same; I know when mine are ready when the plant dies back and everything is dried out. I keep the seeds for both planting and sprouting...

James Turner
6/1/2012 3:45:30 PM
How do you know when the seeds are ready? I'm currently doing this with last seasons Brussels and the pods look identical.

NEBRASKA DAVE
5/21/2012 12:26:17 PM
S.M.R., Now I know why you disappeared for a while. You were writing a book. Good luck with the sale of your book. I am more of a blogger than a writer. I laughed at your Duh moment with the kale seed pods. I don't really think of saving seeds yet. Maybe some time down the road the economy or country situation will require it. It would be a great skill to have. This year I moved four Rutgers volunteer tomatoes from the last year's bed to the tomato bed for this year. They are stronger and tougher than the ones I started indoors and coddled until I set them out. Maybe this fall I'll just throw the cast off tomatoes back in the bed and wait for the volunteers to sprout next spring. Some time in the history of tomatoes they survived on their own with out a gardener's help, didn't they? I remember reading an article about a life time ago about planting very late in the fall when it was too cold for seeds to sprout. I actually tried it with carrots and come spring the carrots not only sprouted but were the best I'd ever grown. I'm not sure why I didn't continue that practice but I guess life got in the way and all gardening got shelved. Have a great day in the garden.



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