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Farm Snake: Sharing a Rural Farm with Snakes

4/22/2010 4:10:11 PM

Tags: Pam, Snakes, Farm, Pests

Living in a rural area one thing you see for sure is snakes. Here are a few we share our farm with.

We think this is the same snake that shows up every spring.

Black snake in a tree

He is huge.

Black snake hanging in tree

The tree is near the pond where I am sure he likes to have meals of frogs and field mice.

Black snake crawling along tree

He likes to spend the summer in this hole in the oak tree.

Snake in a hole in an oak tree

Closeup of snake in an oak tree hole

We have found snakes in the chicken nest boxes.

Snake in a chicken nest box

Like this fellow. He was full of eggs and just decided to nap after his big meal.

Snake resting in chicken nest box

We see snakes when we take walks. Like this non-venomous snake.

Most of the snakes we see here are Black Rat Snakes or King Snakes.

Black Rat Snake or King Snake

We also see venomous snakes like this cottonmouth water moccasin.

Cottonmouth Water Moccasin

He is named for the white lining of its mouth.

Cottonmouth mouth lining

We find long snakes.

Long black snake

Lionel the cat finds snakes in the back yard.

Cat and snake in backyard

We find snakes in the Corturnix/Pharaoh quail pens.

Snake in the quail pen

Like this one. Notice the bulge. He had ate several quails and wrapped around several more.

Snake after eating in quail pen

Snake found in quail pen

Miracle Eve the goat is excited to find a snake at the wood pile.

Goat and Snake in woodpile

Snake in woodpile

Another non-poisonous snake.

Another snake in the woodpile

This is one we weren't real excited to spot around the farm.

Timber rattlesnake

A Timber Rattlesnake. He had 14 rattlers.

Timber Rattlesnake with 14 rattlers

Snakes can eat up a lot of eggs, quail, and baby chicks. They can also play a role in helping to control rodents around a farm.

Good or bad, snakes are just part of life on a rural farm in Georgia.



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Post a comment below.

 

Deepak Sharma
5/9/2013 5:23:38 AM
HELLO SIR, MY SELF DEEPAK SHARMA I AM FROM DELHI ( INDIA ) SIR I WANT TO KNOW ABOUT SNAKE FARMING BECAUSE I WANT TO DO THIS BUSINESS. I HAVE MY OWN LAND IN INDIA AND ALSO HAVE SUFFICIENT AMOUNT FOR THIS. BUT PROBLEM IS THAT I DONT HAVE EXPERIENCE FOR THAT WHICH I WANT FROM YOU.I CAN ALSO READY FOR THIS BUSINESS IN PARTNERSHIP. SIR HELP ME IF YOU CAN DO NOTE:- ( SIR I CAN SUPPLY YOU SO MANY SNAKES IF YOU NEED ) THANKYOU NAME DEEPAK SHARMA ADDRESS G-1/1182, MANSAROVER PARK, SHAHDARA, DELHI 110032 INDIA PHONE NO: 009210030032 MAIL ID DEEPAKSPECTRO@YAHOO.IN

Mary Carton
1/10/2013 3:48:47 AM
I have a rather large rat snake or chicken snakes as we all them in NW Alabama living under my house since shortly after I built.. It's name is Fred. I built on top of a field mice colony and it takes care of the mice under the house. Every once in a while it comes out from under the house by way of the AC unit to sun. I've had to rescue it a couple of times from the Hooligans. I've seen the Hooligans tackle a couple of snakes and it wasn't pretty. Blackie will grab one behind the head and snap it before I can rescue it from them.

Shannon Nelson
1/7/2013 5:29:42 PM
I've seen the RattleSnake kill a child here in south Alabama several years back

Chris Cole
1/7/2013 4:06:08 PM
Just found this. Man you are over run ! I would love to spend a day at your farm collecting. Watch your hands when reaching for those egg's ! And have a Happy new year!

Pam_6
5/17/2010 5:22:19 PM
Hi KCMike, That is a good idea. It is amazing what a little bitty hole a snake can get through. Thanks for the comment. Pam

KCMike
5/14/2010 1:18:41 PM
Read about folks with big snake, like cottonmouth problems. They surrounded their chicken pens and gardens with a low lying chicken wire, probably the 3/4 inch stuff. Big Snakes would crawl into it, get stuck, can't back out and would die. Then the other animals would eat them, chickens included.

Pam_6
4/26/2010 10:05:34 AM
Hi Jon, I agree about the king snakes and black snakes being good to have around a farm. They do help keep mice and rat population down plus the king snakes love a snack of venomous snake. But...the black snakes do love eggs, baby chicks, and quails also. I had to laugh about your preacher's wife reaction. I didn't know I knew some of those words either when I see some of those big snakes curled up in the nest boxes! Thanks for the comment. Hey Cindy, I know what you mean about hanging snakes above your head. We have so many down this way, I have grown used to seeing them up and down. Thanks for the comment. Have a great day. Pam

Cindy Murphy
4/24/2010 5:17:48 PM
Hi, Pam. Those are quite some impressive snakes you've got there! I had my first encounter with a black rat snake a few years ago when I came up on him while I was roller skiing through the woods. At first, I thought it was a fallen branch across the trail. He was sunning himself, and didn't move very fast (at first), so I had a few minutes to study him quite closely before he slithered away. I didn't even know we had snakes that big in Michigan! (The black rat snake the our largest snake.) I saw him (or others like him) often for a few years, though always on the ground. I'd probably freak and wipe out on the trail if I saw one hanging above my head from a tree branch, though. I don't mind snakes.....as long as I know they're there, and can steer clear. I want absolutely no surprises when it comes to those slithery guys!!!! Have a great weekend.

Jon _2
4/24/2010 3:00:36 PM
Black snakes and King snakes are your best friends when they stay outta the hen house. In our Missouri farm place, a huge black snake named Oscar was our weekly visitor. I liked him but he caused our preacher's wife to shout a word that we didn't even know she knew. Copperheads and Water Moccasins were killed if they came into the yard. Rattlesnakes in the woods were left alone however, by the house......shotgun time. Great pictures by the way..Be careful and stay happy..

Pam_6
4/23/2010 2:22:44 PM
Hi MountainWoman and Nebraska Dave, Last year was the year for snakes around here. I guess it was because we had so many chickens, quails, and eggs around. We had 13 snakes that we know of in the chicken coop alone. They do love eggs! I have to admit I am not a snake fan but since I grew up in the country and have always lived in the country, I am used to seeing snakes. I try to avoid them, but it isn't easy sometimes. They are everywhere! Or at least they were last year. Maybe this year there will be less snake sightings. P.S. I loved that Indiana Jones! Have a great weekend. Pam

Nebraska Dave
4/23/2010 9:29:37 AM
Pam, I’m with Indiana Jones. Why did it have to be snakes. I hate snakes. Here in Nebraska about the scariest thing at the urban ranch would be a garter snake. I have never seen one on my property but they are a sneaky little snakes that live in the cracks and crevices of just about any where. I know they eat bugs and small rodents, but I just don’t like them. We do have poisonous snakes here the king being the rattler. I spent time in Missouri and have run into water moccasins and if I had to deal with a snake I’d rather it be a rattler. Moccasins are just plain mean and evil. Where as a rattler will try to escape, a moccasin will come after a person just because they want to. I know snakes have some part in God’s grand scheme of ecological balance but I sure could do with out them. As you can tell I am definitely not a snake lover. They are just creepy and sneaky and even climb trees. Eeeeeuuuuu. I’d just rather deal with teeth and claws than fangs. Sorry I know there are those probably that love snakes and even have one as a pet but I’m just not one of those people. I hope everyone’s snake encounters have good endings.

Mountain Woman
4/23/2010 7:45:16 AM
Hi Pam, I didn't look at your pictures because I'm terrified of snakes and I know from reading your blog those are some super scary snakes. We have wonderful, small, non poisonous snakes on our farm and even those give me the creepy crawlies. You are one brave woman!



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