One-Block Feast: Guide to Winter Garden Vegetables

Find out which seeds to plant this frosty season with Sunset Magazine’s simple guide to winter garden vegetables, and you can enjoy the decadence of crunchy, vitamin-rich greens during the dead of winter.

| November 2012

  • Winter Garden Vegetables
    The leafy greens and succulent cruciferous vegetables we raised for our winter menu grow best when air temperatures are cool.
    Photo By Thomas J. Story (c) 2011
  • One-Block Feast Cover
    “The One-Block Feast,” by Margo True and the staff of Sunset Magazine, is for readers nationwide who believe that dinner starts with earth, the sea, and a few animals. Take local eating to the next level with this cooking and gardening guide, complete with DIY food projects.
    Cover Courtesy Ten Speed Press
  • Winter Garden Vegetables Plan
    Sunset Magazine's winter garden vegetable plan is a useful guide for making your winter menu a green one.
    Illustration Courtesy Ten Speed Press
  • Alcosa Savoy Cabbage
    This curly-leaved Savoy cabbage forms tight heads that are ideal for closely spaced planting. Also, its leaves are dense, crinkled, and colorful—blue-green outside, lighter green to creamy white inside—and pretty in garden beds with other greens.
    Photo By Thomas J. Story (c) 2011
  • Arugula
    Arugula or rocket (roquette in French) has tender, deep green leaves that add a peppery bite to salads.
    Photo By Thomas J. Story (c) 2011
  • Broccoli Romanesco Veronica
    This variety’s round heads, made up of chartreuse florets that spiral into little peaks, make it look like cauliflower from another planet.
    Photo By Thomas J. Story (c) 2011
  • Cassius Cauliflower
    We grew this variety because it produces round, creamy white heads 7 to 8 inches across—the perfect size for a compact kitchen garden.
    Photo By Thomas J. Story (c) 2011
  • Red Butterhead Lettuce
    Red butterhead is a French heirloom variety whose loosely cupped green leaves are tinged with shades of ruby, rose-pink, and bronze.
    Photo By Thomas J. Story (c) 2011
  • Green Wave Mustard
    Mustard comes in different colors and textures, but we like ‘Green Wave’ for its lime-green hue, ruffl ed edges, and pungent, peppery flavor.
    Photo By Thomas J. Story (c) 2011

  • Winter Garden Vegetables
  • One-Block Feast Cover
  • Winter Garden Vegetables Plan
  • Alcosa Savoy Cabbage
  • Arugula
  • Broccoli Romanesco Veronica
  • Cassius Cauliflower
  • Red Butterhead Lettuce
  • Green Wave Mustard

Based on the James-Beard-Award-winning One-Block Diet, The One-Block Feast (Ten Speed Press, 2011) is the ultimate guide to eating local. Complete with seasonal garden plans, menus, 100 recipes and 15 food projects, this guide explains how to raise and produce everything needed for totally made-from-scratch meals, all from your own backyard. The following excerpt on winter garden vegetables is taken from “Winter.” 

You can purchase this book from the GRIT store: The One-Block Feast.

Guide to Winter Garden Vegetables

The leafy greens and succulent cruciferous vegetables we raised for our winter menu grow best when air temperatures are cool. Yet they thrive in sunny locations (at least 6 hours of sun per day). Arugula is easy to grow from seeds, while other crops, including lettuce, yield plentifully from nursery plants. If you can, avoid planting in any “frost pockets”—low areas that can get frost earlier than other parts of your garden. Use our winter garden plan as a tool to help you lay out your winter garden vegetables.

Arugula 

Arugula or rocket (roquette in French) has tender, deep green leaves that add a peppery bite to salads. Crops come fast: You can pick baby leaves in as little as 3 weeks. To prolong the harvest, sow in succession every 3 weeks.



Best Site: An open, sunny spot and well-drained soil.

Days to Harvest: 35 days from seed.





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