15 Healthy Winter Recipes

Snuggle in with this delicious, nutritious winter menu provided by the staff of Sunset Magazine. Their spread of healthy winter recipes tastes best when made with local ingredients from your winter vegetable garden.

| November 2012

  • Cutting Tangerines
    We wanted a hearty salad for our winter menu, with lots of different textures and flavors. Tangerines fit the bill perfectly.
    Photo By Thomas J. Story (c) 2011
  • Wheat Berry Ciabatta
    We ate this shaggy-crumbed, chewy, steamy loaf slathered with homemade butter and sprinkled with sea salt.
    Photo By Thomas J. Story (c) 2011
  • Egg Cloud Nuvolone
    A dish from the Italian Alps, nuvolone—the word means “big cloud”—is like a deconstructed soufflé, with the whites piled in a fluffy peak above the liquid yolk.
    Photo By Thomas J. Story (c) 2011
  • Kale Colcannon
    Colcannon is one of the genius ways that the Irish have with potatoes—mashing them up with milk, good butter, and cooked kale or cabbage. It is simple but delicious.
    Photo By Thomas J. Story (c) 2011
  • Featherlight Pancakes
    These featherlight pancakes are based on a recipe Sunset published years ago for German “egg cakes” (Eierkuchen) from the Elk Cove Inn, in the Northern California coastal town of Elk.
    Photo By Thomas J. Story (c) 2011
  • Ricotta Manicotti
    Maria Helm Sinskey, author of The Vineyard Kitchen: Menus Inspired by the Seasons, makes her manicotti with crepes instead of dried pasta—just like her great-grandmother did.
    Photo By Thomas J. Story (c) 2011
  • Braised Winter Greens
    If you have a jar of preserved lemons and some dried chiles on hand, you can make these supremely satisfying greens quickly.
    Photo By Thomas J. Story (c) 2011
  • Winter Vegetable Chowder
    Cold rain hits the San Francisco Bay Area in January and February. A big bowl of this creamy chowder gives lasting, delicious warmth. To make it pretty, we sprinkled it with broccoli rabe and rosemary flowers.
    Photo By Thomas J. Story (c) 2011
  • Wheat Berry Risotto
    Many grains other than rice can be cooked like risotto, and wheat berries from soft winter wheat are one of them. As you stir them, they drink in hot liquid and their starchy outer hulls dissolve into delectable creaminess.
    Photo By Thomas J. Story (c) 2011
  • Tangerine Honey Flan
    Without baking soda or baking powder, we couldn’t make cakes. But we could make this fantastic flan—smooth, rich, cool, and creamy.
    Photo By Thomas J. Story (c) 2011
  • Tangerine Marmalade
    This Scottish-style marmalade is thick and delectably chewy, with a pleasantly bitter edge.
    Photo By Thomas J. Story (c) 2011
  • One-Block Feast Cover
    “The One-Block Feast,” by Margo True and the staff of Sunset Magazine, is for readers nationwide who believe that dinner starts with earth, the sea, and a few animals. Take local eating to the next level with this cooking and gardening guide, complete with DIY food projects.
    Cover Courtesy Ten Speed Press

  • Cutting Tangerines
  • Wheat Berry Ciabatta
  • Egg Cloud Nuvolone
  • Kale Colcannon
  • Featherlight Pancakes
  • Ricotta Manicotti
  • Braised Winter Greens
  • Winter Vegetable Chowder
  • Wheat Berry Risotto
  • Tangerine Honey Flan
  • Tangerine Marmalade
  • One-Block Feast Cover

Based on the James-Beard-Award-winning One-Block Diet, The One-Block Feast (Ten Speed Press, 2011) is the ultimate guide to eating local. Complete with seasonal garden plans, menus, 100 recipes and 15 food projects, this guide explains how to raise and produce everything needed for totally made-from-scratch meals, all from your own backyard. The following healthy winter recipes are excerpted from “Winter Recipes.” 

You can purchase this book from the GRIT store: The One-Block Feast.

Arugula and Red Butterhead Lettuce Salad With Tangerines and Hard-Cooked Eggs Recipe

We wanted a hearty salad for our winter menu, with lots of different textures and flavors. The core idea was eggs on toast—which we translated into wedges of hard-cooked egg and crunchy, garlicky croutons. The lettuces lighten everything up and the tangerines are nuggets of juicy sweetness.

If you use eggs from your own chickens, or are buying eggs from the farmers’ market, let them sit in the fridge for at least a week before you cook them (if eggs are too fresh, they’re hard to peel).



Makes: 6 to 8 servings
Time: about 1 hour

6 to 8 large eggs (not super-fresh) 
2 teaspoons freshly squeezed tangerine juice 
1/2 teaspoon finely grated tangerine zest 
3/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
 
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil 
2 cloves garlic 
3 thin slices Wheat Berry Ciabatta (keep reading for this recipe), cut into 1/2-inch cubes (about 1 1/2 cups) 
5 cups loosely packed arugula leaves 
6 cups loosely packed red butterhead lettuce leaves (about 1/2 small head) 
2 large or 4 small tangerines 






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