How to Grow Strawberries in Your Garden

Grow strawberries; they are easy to produce and deserve a place in your garden.


  • Strawberries ready to be picked.
    Strawberries ready to be picked.
    iStockphoto.com/Shuchun Ke
  • Fresh strawberries, straight from the garden, are a great summer treat.
    Fresh strawberries, straight from the garden, are a great summer treat.
    Lori Dunn
  • Strawberries with new growth.
    New spring growth tells you that great-tasting strawberries are on the way.
    Biz Reynolds
  • Strawberry blossoms
    A strawberry blossom is nearly as beautiful as the ripe, red strawberry it will produce.
    Biz Reynolds
  • Srawberry plant runners
    Notice how the plant puts out new runners, and trim some. Too many will crowd the patch.
    Biz Reynolds

  • Strawberries ready to be picked.
  • Fresh strawberries, straight from the garden, are a great summer treat.
  • Strawberries with new growth.
  • Strawberry blossoms
  • Srawberry plant runners

Side Bar:  U-Pick Strawberries and Growing Tips  

Strawberries – everyone’s favorite fruit – are welcome heralds of summer, and they are so easy to grow in a garden, flower bed, or any patch of sandy soil – even in a patio pot.

Strawberry plants are inexpensive and available in most local nurseries and mail-order garden catalogs. Any gardener will have success growing the fruit if she follows a few simple rules.

Why grow your own? Nothing is more pleasant than getting up early on a clear sunny morning, wandering outside while a mockingbird sings, and finding five or six dewy, sparkling red berries with which to decorate your morning bowl of cereal. The flavor of fresh berries is rich, pure and crisp.



Several years ago when my U-Pick berry patch in Johnson County, Missouri, was at its height of popularity, good store-bought commercial berries were hard to find. The overly large cone-shaped Driscoll variety, widely available at most grocery stores, lacked flavor and had a crunchy texture making it difficult to believe that these were even an edible food. Since then, producers have come a long way in improving the commercial strawberry, and although still overly firm (necessary for successful shipping), the flavor has improved. However, outstanding flavor, convenience, cost, quality and stellar health benefits are all good reasons for cultivating your own patch, large or small.

What variety?

I have grown berries in my yard for many years, experimenting with several different cultivars. But I keep coming back to the same old variety – Surecrop. It is the first berry type I grew more than 20 years ago and is in my garden this spring. It’s the variety that I regularly provide for the participants in the local strawberry-growing classes that I teach.

Hans Quistorff
1/26/2013 8:51:52 AM

I have settled on raising my strawberries in a rock garden. Excavation for our house site left me with a south-east facing bank which required rock to hold it in place. Planting strawberries in the spaces between rocks has make a very prolific easy to maintain bed. I don't have to bend over to pick berries. the rocks hold heat to hasten early ripening and the orientation protects them from over heating in the evening. Dirt doesn't splash on them when it rains. runners can be directed to open cracks to keep renewing the bed.




Live The Good Life with GRIT!

Grit JulAug 2016At GRIT, we have a tradition of respecting the land that sustains rural America. That's why we want you to save money and trees by subscribing to GRIT through our automatic renewal savings plan. By paying now with a credit card, you save an additional $6 and get 6 issues of GRIT for only $16.95 (USA only).

Or, Bill Me Later and send me one year of GRIT for just $22.95!




Facebook Pinterest Instagram YouTube Twitter

Free Product Information Classifieds Newsletters