Two Years Off-Grid: Home Power


| 9/26/2017 1:51:00 PM


Two Years Off-Grid
Part One: Home Power

We are fast approaching the end of our second full year of living unplugged from the electric grid (yeah for team solar!). It has been a phenomenal experience so far and, after a few initial tweaks, the house has performed better than expected. Our home is completely normal, being an 1,800-square-foot two-story with three bathrooms (yeah for flushing toilets!!!) and central air. In fact, the house is so "normal" that almost no one believes it is battery powered...that is until we show them the battery bank in the garage.

“How can a house this size be off-grid?” is a question we often hear.

The short answer: because technology has outpaced awareness. There are two major factors to this gap between preconceived notions and reality. The first is cost and the second is efficiency.

 

Grit-House-Pic_1



Cost:

nebraskadave
11/9/2017 4:23:27 PM

Jack, I've thought for some time now that it should be required to have solar panels on any new house built. I have a daughter in Las Vegas that installed solar panels on her house and found out that she could only install four. Apparently, it was against a city ordinance to install more than four. Power companies are crying about having to upgrade their systems and build more power plants and yet they don't want to lose money by having customers install too many solar panels. Las Vegas has sunshine almost every day of the year which is a perfect place to use them. Bureaucrats can cause more bottle necks in progress at times. Hopefully, some day all power will come from some thing other than non renewable resources. I'm impressed with your story about being off the grid for two years. The cost of solar power has indeed come down. Here in the Midwest, wind generators seem to be the choice of power generation. Iowa and Kansas have thousands of them. My state of Nebraska is not so much into new age technology when it comes to power generation. Maybe some day they will get up to speed but for now it's still five train loads of coal from Montana each day to keep the lights on in my city. I'm looking forward to more updates on your off the grid homesteading. Nebraska Dave