Include a Chef Mini Torch for Desserts in Your Kitchen

K.C. Compton shares how adding a chef mini torch as part of your kitchen equipment is ideal for special desserts such as crème brûlée, baked Alaska, meringue as well as roasting vegetables.


| January/February 2007


Including a chef mini torch for desserts as part of your kitchen equipment is a great idea. 

A torch can be a wonderful addition to any kitchen. You could caramelize your crème brûlée with the flamethrower you used on the dandelions, but why try? For one thing, you might catch the kitchen on fire; for another, if you use a propane-fueled torch in the kitchen, everything might taste like propane. This is not a desirable trait in most food products.

Instead, use propane’s better-behaved little brother, a handsome, butane-powered kitchen all-star, a chef mini torch. You can roast peppers, loosen tomato skins and, of course, give the signature brûlée crunch to a variety of delicious dishes.

See www.ChefDepot.net/Minitorch.htm for some mini torch models.

Here’s an easy-peasy brûlée recipe to get you started.

K.C.’s Crème Brûlée Recipe

1 quart heavy cream
1 vanilla bean
¾ cup very fine granulated sugar
9 egg yolks
 

Karen Mallaber
8/8/2009 9:01:39 PM

Is there a torch that will not flame out when the nozzle is higher than the tank as used for Creme Brulee? Martha Stewart uses a regular "Bernzomatic" type for her Creme Brulee, but when I do, it flames out? Thanks






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