• INFUSE: HERBAL TEAS TO CLEANSE, NOURISH AND HEAL

    Lost your zest for life? Feeling tired and sluggish? Need a health boost? Reach for a soothing cup of herbal tea and harness the extraordinary power of nature's most potent healing ingredients. With more than 70 expertly formulated recipes for tasty, soothing, caffeine-free infusions, this book will have you blending, brewing, and sipping your way to well-being. It also includes tips to help you get the most from your brew, as well as a comprehensive directory of herbal ingredients and their active properties and benefits.

    Item: 7999
  • JAMIE DURIE'S THE OUTDOOR ROOM

    CLEARANCE ITEM. PREVIOUS RETAIL PRICE WAS $25.99 AVAILABLE ONLY WHILE SUPPLIES LAST!

    Jamie Durie, international award-winning horticulturalist and landscape designer, reveals the secrets behind his incredible designs on the ever-popular HGTV series The Outdoor Room, now viewed in more than 12 countries. With dynamic photography, including Durie's personal travel photographs and a sneak peek of his private garden, this information-packed companion to his smash-hit t.v. show is as hardworking as it is stunning.

    Complete with detailed site plans, zonal plant lists, and helpful eco-tips, it covers everything from the basics of landscape design to practical, hands-on information, such as how to design your own private garden using Durie's philosophy. From an exotic Balinese-inspired dining pavilion to a private English-style garden with an adjoining children's play area, Durie shows you how to incorporate his techniques and design principles to create a personal and truly unique garden, giving you and your family and friends the opportunity to reconnect with nature in the privacy of your very own outdoor room.

    Item: 5455
  • JO MASEBERG SET

    CLEARANCE ITEM. PREVIOUS RETAIL PRICE WAS $24.95. AVAILABLE ONLY WHILE SUPPLIES LAST!

    Now your favorite author is available in one complete set! Jo Maseberg's fiction, portraying modern-day heroines and homesteading on the Great Plains is here.

    The Compromise

    Ellie MacCready's family was forced to sell their farm in the Nebraska Sand Hills when she was a teenager. Now Ellie has returned to the Sand Hills to teach in a one-room school, and she rents a small house on the old family farm, currently owned by Zane Redding. Money is tight, though, and Zane may have to sell the farm. Then Ellie proposes a compromise: She will become a partner, investing in the farm to keep it going, and Zane will keep a controlling interest. As they work through the seasons together, their friendship grows, and they find they share more than just the land and a dream.

    The Decision

    Julie O'Brien closes her photography business and moves to Nebraska's Sand Hills to make a new start with her father, Gil, after her mother's death. When one of her horses is hurt, Julie turns to Peter Cook, the local veterinarian. When Peter asks Julie to photograph his parents' ranch, they find that they are becoming good friends. But outside circumstances force both Julie and Peter to make decisions about staying in the Sand Hills.

    The Bargain

    Young widow Jenny Cook is at her wits' end trying to figure out how she'll support herself and young son, Peter. Then she inherits her grandfather's ranch in Nebraska. As she takes up ranching, she makes a bargain with her neighbor, Mike Snow. He'll teach her about ranching if she'll cook dinner for him every day. Together, they face the hardships of winter and find that hard work may mend a broken heart.

    The Agreement

    Caroline McInnes is tired of being used for her money and her father’s influence, so she flees her hometown of Cleveland to claim free land in Nebraska. Her first taste of Nebraska, however, comes with consequences, when a snowstorm nearly ruins her plans. While riding out the storm, Caroline meets cattle rancher Henry Riley, and when desperate times call for desperate measures, Henry quickly proposes a solution. With no other choice, Caroline accepts, and the two agree that they can make things work. As friendship blooms between them, Caroline fears that Henry may be falling in love with her, which she claims she doesn’t want. With help from her neighbors and friends, Caroline learns what it’s like to be a frontier woman, and realizes she likes it – and that she, too, has feelings for Henry. When Henry discovers that Caroline has been lying to him, she’ll do whatever it takes to prove that she loves him.

    Item: 3605
  • JUST THE GREATEST LIFE

    Just the Greatest Life is a collection of stories that has warmed hearts around the world. Struggling farmers, amazing neighbors, four-legged friends, and an awe of and appreciation for nature make this self-published page-turner a book you'll read again and again. The editor of Country Journal called it a "pure, inspiring treasure" about a "life gone real." Fellow grass farmer, Joel Salatin, says "Schafer captures the exuberance of newly discovering the 'culture' of agri-culture and the satisfaction of a better way."

    Item: 1491
  • KEEPING BEES WITH A SMILE

    You will gain a profound respect for the bees’ intelligence, the practical information for successfully starting and maintaining a few (or many!) colonies in your own backyard, and an appreciation of the bees’ harmonious cooperative ways—which may be key to creating a brighter future for our planet.

    Item: 8773
  • LANDSCAPING WITH EDIBLE PLANTS IN TEXAS

    In this complete reference to integrating edible plants into a wide range of private and public landscapes, landscape designer Cheryl Beesley thoroughly answers the questions of how to plant, where to plant and what to plant.

    Item: 7857
  • LENTIL UNDERGROUND

    From the heart of Big Sky Country comes this inspiring story of a handful of colorful pioneers who have successfully bucked the chemically based food chain and the entrenched power of agribusiness’s one percent by stubbornly banding together. Journalist and native Montanan Liz Carlisle weaves an eye-opening and richly reported narrative that will be welcomed by everyone concerned with the future of American agriculture and natural food in an increasingly uncertain world.

    Item: 8035
  • LEON: FAMILY & FRIENDS

    CLEARANCE $19.79 Leon Family & Friends is the third cookbook to be published in the United States from the healthy British fast food restaurant chain Leon, and it contains hundreds of recipes for flavorful, nutritious food that won't take hours to prepare.

    Item: 6776
  • LETTERS FROM THE LARKSONG

    This collection reflects the rhythm of farm life; where that most forgiving of animals, the horse, sets the pace and the range. These letters are addressed to the most fundamental need of people, land, and community nurture.

    Item: 6165
  • LIFE, LIBERTY AND THE PURSUIT OF FOOD RIGHTS

    Do Americans have the right to privately obtain the foods of our choice from farmers, neighbors, and local producers, in the same way our grandparents and great grandparents used to do?

    Yes, say a growing number of people increasingly afraid that the mass-produced food sold at supermarkets is excessively processed, tainted with antibiotic residues and hormones, and lacking in important nutrients. These people, a million or more, are seeking foods outside the regulatory system, like raw milk, custom-slaughtered beef, and pastured eggs from chickens raised without soy, purchased directly from private membership-only food clubs that contract with Amish and other farmers.

    Public-health and agriculture regulators, however, say no: Americans have no inherent right to eat what they want. In today's ever-more-dangerous food-safety environment, they argue, all food, no matter the source, must be closely regulated, and even barred, if it fails to meet certain standards. These regulators, headed up by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, with help from state agriculture departments, police, and district-attorney detectives, are mounting intense and sophisticated investigative campaigns against farms and food clubs supplying privately exchanged food—even handcuffing and hauling off to jail, under threat of lengthy prison terms, those deemed in violation of food laws.

    Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Food Rights takes readers on a disturbing cross-country journey from Maine to California through a netherworld of Amish farmers paying big fees to questionable advisers to avoid the quagmire of America’s legal system, secret food police lurking in vans at farmers markets, cultish activists preaching the benefits of pathogens, U.S. Justice Department lawyers clashing with local sheriffs, small Maine towns passing ordinances to ban regulation, and suburban moms worried enough about the dangers of supermarket food that they’ll risk fines and jail to feed their children unprocessed, and unregulated, foods of their choosing.

    Out of the intensity of this unprecedented crackdown, and the creative and spirited opposition that is rising to meet it, a new rallying cry for food rights is emerging.

    Item: 6793
  • LIVING LARGE IN OUR LITTLE HOUSE

    Based on the successful blog of the same name, Living Large in Our Little House is a practical and inspirational memoir about the joy and freedom of tiny house living. Traditionally, the American dream has included owning a house, and until recently that meant the bigger, the better. McMansions have flourished in suburbs across the country, and as houses got bigger we filled them with more stuff. Kerri Fivecoat-Campbell had been subconsciously trying to live up to this ideal when circumstances forced her and her husband into a 480-square-foot house in the woods. What was supposed to be a writing cabin and guest house became their full-time abode and they quickly discovered that they had serendipitously discovered a better way of life. They realized that by living smaller, they were, in fact, living large. They were not spending extra time cleaning and maintaining the house, but had the freedom to pursue their hobbies; they did not waste money on things they didn’t need; and they grew emotionally (as well as physically) closer. Kerri and her husband realized that living large is less about square footage and more about a state of mind. As Fivecoat-Campbell relates the story of her own transformation, she also profiles more than a dozen other families living tiny house lives. And she offers practical advice for how you can too.

    Her book:

    • walks you through the financial advantages of small space living
    • helps you define and find the right size house
    • teaches you to scale down to the essentials, to be surrounded only by things you love
    • shows you how to make use of outdoor space
    • gives tips on how to decorate judiciously
    • and much more!

    Whether readers are inspired to join the tiny house movement or not, they are sure to be inspired to live large with less.

    Item: 8143
  • LIVING ON THE EDGE

    When it comes to survival, one size definitely does not fit all. That's exactly what author F. J. Bohan discovered when he and his family set out on a quest for self-sufficiency, a journey that has lasted more than 17 years. Living on the Edge describes why Bohan and his wife made the decision to pull their four sons from public school in the East and set off in a converted school bus to the American Southwest. On a very limited budget, the Bohans began their new life in a tent pitched on public campgrounds. As soon as they could, they purchased remote ranchland, where they built a rustic cabin from the ground up. It grew as they could afford to add on, and they also homeschooled the boys so well that all four received scholarships to the schools of their choice. On their journey, the Bohans learned a lot about living off the land and off the grid, mostly through trial and error. In this book, the author graciously shares valuable lessons on the following: § Keeping a wife, four boys, two dogs and two cats happy in a tent for 18 months § Creating power for a tent or cabin through a combination of solar panels, car batteries, generators and oil § Heating and cooking on wood stoves § Finding creative ways to earn money in an insular, impoverished rural area § Securing enough water in the desert for a family of six, plus animals, to live on § Erecting fences—literal and figurative ones—for privacy and security § Raising chickens, goats and ducks for food, while avoiding bears, bobcats, skunks and other country critters Relocating to the desert, living in a tent or homeschooling kids may not appeal to you. But if you have ever thought of living off the grid or simply becoming more self-sufficient, this is how one American family successfully did it . . . and found freedom along the way.

    Item: 6599

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