Brioche Recipe

Brioche is a rich, eggy bread you can make at home.


| March 2013



Brioche

Use fresh eggs to make brioche, a rich, buttery bread.

Photo Courtesy Fotolia/A.L.

Homegrown and Handmade shows how making things from scratch and growing at least some of your own food can help you eliminate artificial ingredients from your diet, reduce your carbon footprint and create a more authentic life. Author Deborah Niemann writes from the perspective of a successful, self-taught modern homesteader, in a well-illustrated, practical and accessible manual for a simpler life. In this excerpt, get tips for using your poultry to its full potential by making this recipe for brioche, a buttery bread. 

You can buy this book from the GRIT store: Homegrown and Handmade.

More from Homegrown & Handmade:

Cooking With Eggs From Your Backyard Flock 
Crustless Quiche Recipe
Easy Homemade Noodles Recipe
Farm-Fresh Chicken Soup Recipe
Homemade Mayonnaise Recipe 
Turkey Stroganoff Recipe
Crème Brûlée Pie Recipe 

This bread is a great way to use up nine eggs quickly, and it is the perfect bread for French toast and bread pudding, which will use up even more eggs.

Brioche Recipe

1 1/2 cups warm water (temperature of bath water)
1 1/2 tablespoons yeast
1 tablespoon salt
1 1/2 cups (3 sticks) butter
1/2 cup honey
9 eggs
8–10 cups flour

Put the first three ingredients into a large mixing bowl or the bowl of a stand mixer that has a 6-quart bowl. Melt the butter in the measuring cup, and add it to the bowl. Then use the buttery measuring cup to measure the honey and add it to the bowl. (You do this so the honey slips right out of the cup.) Add the eggs and 7 cups of the flour and begin mixing. The dough will be sticky when everything is thoroughly mixed. Begin adding flour in 1/2 cup increments, mixing thoroughly between additions, up to 8 1/2 cups. At some point, you will probably have to give up the spoon and start mixing with your hands. When you have added 8 1/2 cups of flour, add more in 1/4-cup increments until the dough is no longer sticky. If you are using a mixer with a dough hook, the dough is ready when the dough hook is pushing it around the bowl in a ball. Do not add any additionalflour once it reaches that point. Towards the end, you should add flour a couple of tablespoons at a time because it is much easier to make wet dough drier than the other way around.





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