Year End Garden Summary


| 12/21/2015 12:52:00 PM


Adventures of Old Nebraska DaveAll gardeners whether intentional or not will evaluate the garden year and determine if it was a success or failure. Most times it's a bit of both. For me there's no logic behind what does well one year and not the next. Nature has a way of determining what's going to happen in a garden. Yes, the gardener can help things along but ultimately weather, critters, disease, bugs, and what ever else is dead set on destroying a garden will decide a good year from a bad one. Most of the articles and books that I've read say to plan on food storage for at least two years because what is a bumper crop one year may be a total failure the next. I really don't store up a lot of food. I grow it to savor when it's in season and to give away to those that have lost the memory of what real food should taste like. Most of what I grow is for family, friends, and neighbors. Unfortunately, they have been so programmed that produce must be perfect in every way, it's sometimes difficult to give it away. It's sad to think that consumers have come to put looks and long lasting storage above taste and nutrition. So let's get to it.

Poor mans Living Patio

Sadly I said goodbye to the Poor Man's Living Patio for this year. It was a spectacular year for all the plants on the patio. After this picture was taken, all the plants were removed and sent out in the yard waste bags. It's always a sad day when the end of the plant season comes. The Spring is always a better season for me. Also after this picture was taken a new addition to the patio was donated to me from my cousin. I've always wanted cast iron patio furniture. My cousin was getting rid of a small round table and two chairs made from heavy cast iron and wooden features. It was just what I've been wanting. Nice!!

Potatoes

Well how about the great potato experiment with multiple layers. How well did they do?



Potato Harvest





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