Prepping For Fall


| 9/22/2016 10:09:00 AM


Kelly

Early autumn sunset.

I know, I know ... it’s only September. But in my part of the world we have had some very nice days followed by some very cool evenings that let us know that fall is soon coming, and just look at that gorgeous autumn sunset in the above photo! The weather got me thinking: fall provides some decision making opportunities for the garden. You can either a) close up shop for the year until spring arrives again, or b) plant some cool-weather crops and continue gardening into winter. I decided to do a little research about both and share what I came up with. Read on!

When I say “close up shop” for the year, I mean stop growing vegetables. But, in reality, there’s work to be done even if you decide to put your garden to rest for the season. You can do a lot in the fall and winter months to prep your garden for the next season, such as pulling up dead weeds and crops and adding a layer of compost to your gardening area. The Old Farmer’s Almanac has an extensive list of things you can do at their website.

The other option is, of course, to grow some cool-weather crops and continue your gardening pleasure. I have never grown these types of plants, so I had to look up what could even be grown when planting as late as September. In some parts of the country, September planting may be too late, but here in Maryland I could still plant any of the following and get something going ... I mean growing:



• Kale
• Spinach
• Broccoli
• Peas
• Beets
• Carrots





Live The Good Life with GRIT!

Grit JulAug 2016At GRIT, we have a tradition of respecting the land that sustains rural America. That's why we want you to save money and trees by subscribing to GRIT through our automatic renewal savings plan. By paying now with a credit card, you save an additional $6 and get 6 issues of GRIT for only $16.95 (USA only).

Or, Bill Me Later and send me one year of GRIT for just $22.95!




Facebook Pinterest Instagram YouTube Twitter

Free Product Information Classifieds