Bacteria, Buggies and Bad Gardening


| 3/23/2015 12:19:00 PM


Tags: Tomato, GMO, Potting Soil, Johnnys Seeds, Rima Austin,

Rima Austin“Hmmm … it could be bacteria or buggies in the soil,” said the sweet girl at Johnny’s Seeds when I called to explain to her that all but two tomato plants that I transferred last weekend died. Just up and died. I said, “Buggies?” She explained that, depending on the potting soil I purchased, it could have contained bugs in it that were not suitable for my plants. She asked if the young plants that I was transplanting all had at least two leaves on them. I told her that they did, and she said that meant there is nothing wrong with the seeds themselves. I have always been satisfied with the seeds that Johnny’s Seeds has sent me in the past so that left the soil.

These are the tomatoes we recently transplanted and you can see all of them have two leaves on them and look healthy. 

These are the tomatoes we recently transplanted and you can see all of them have two leaves on them and look healthy.

An example of the wonderful goodness we received last year. The tomatoes, peppers and egg plant were all started from seed in Scott’s Premium potting soil.

An example of the wonderful goodness we received last year. The tomatoes, peppers and egg plant were all started from seed in Scotts Premium potting soil.

This had me thinking about what I did different this year than I did last year. Last year, I ordered 120 tomato plants from Johnny’s Seeds and planted every one of them. In the past, it has always been my experience that some seeds, for some reason or other, do not come up. Not this time. Every one of those plants came up; I had 120 growing tomato plants! Just so we’re clear, not tomatoes…tomato plants! Of course I was ecstatic but I didn’t have room for them all in my garden. I ended up throwing a lot of them in the compost pile, and they grew in the compost pile! For weeks I would walk by the compost pile gate and eat tomatoes right off the vine that were growing on the fence.

pat
3/27/2015 6:02:28 PM

I would buy a few and raise a few from seed. Tomato seed keeps for years. BTW, your plants look a little small to transplant. 2 leaves means 2 true leaves, not the seed leaves. My most common probelm is over or under watereing. Maybe your potting soil held more water this year, and they got too much.


brenm
3/26/2015 8:27:37 PM

The problem with summer heat is when the plants are flowering. If the day temps are in the 90s and the night temps do not drop below 70; the tomato plants will drop their blossoms to protect themselves. If you have a way of controlling the excess heat without getting below 6 hours of direct sun- I would give it a shot anyway.





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