Garden Fencing


| 4/26/2012 4:15:52 PM


Tags: garden, raised bed, fencing, winter cover, hoop houses, Allan Douglas,

Allan-HeadshotFencing around a garden primarily serves one purpose: keeping pests out.  Before choosing a type of fence, you need to decide which pests are likely to be a bother to you and select an appropriate style of fencing.  A little research is recommended before making your final decision.

Garden Slope and perimeter fence 

Two years ago I decided to start a small garden.  It was approximately 30’ x30’ with one corner taken out by a 10x12 barn.  Deer and coon have not been a problem here.  I expected rabbits would be a problem, and I suspected dogs would as well: they love digging in soft dirt to bury their treasures and the last thing I wanted was to fork up a potato patch and find a desiccated possum.  I chose (without research) to use a standard four foot high welded wire fencing using 2” x 3” grids.  I drove in metal fence posts and attached the fencing to the posts with bailing wire.  It was simple, quick and fairly inexpensive.

This fencing kept the dogs out, but not the rabbits.  I expected that itty-bitty baby bunnies would get through the fencing, but the big fat hares would have to hang around outside and watch.  I was wrong.  It seems rabbits don’t actually have any bones; for the things can squeeze through some amazingly small spaces.  When I caught the adult rabbits in the garden and went running down the hill yelling and waving my arms, the hasenpfeffer on the hoof would take off like a shot, there would be a “clang” when they hit the fence, but it didn’t even slow them down, they ran right through it.

Had I done my research, I’d have discovered that there is a “rabbit fence” that is similar to the fencing I used but has smaller grids at the lower 18 inches to keep the bunny vermin out.  I pinch-hit with chicken wire.

This year I expanded the garden by a factor of four.  I thought about re-fencing with the rabbit fence, but there are a few additional problems with that.  One is the topography: my garden is not flat and level.  Wire fencing does not conform to hills, dips and slopes well.  Another is the fact that the garden now cuts a swath through the middle of my “front yard” meaning that I will need to traverse it with the lawn tractor to mow and do routine maintenance.  Gates are a pain in the keester.  Last year I did have two gates, but I use the term loosely for they were more like flaps of fence with a board stapled to the free end.  One gate at each end of the fence run where it butted up to the barn.  Bent nails held the board against the barn to close the “gate”.  Such a rudimentary system would not work this time.

barry
3/13/2016 8:41:38 AM

I'd like to try your pvc fencing. what diameter pipe do you use?


elizabethsagarminaga
1/26/2015 3:11:17 AM

Your idea is nice! Garden fence is good that gives an appealing look and protects you from the unwanted and outer disturbances. So going for a garden fencing is beneficial in two ways as it gives both, beauty with security. You can visit my site for more of this stuff. Thanks for nice ideas. http://www.californiafenceco.com/products.html


scott dayhoff
4/21/2013 4:19:29 AM

i would suggest using schedule 40 or maybe 80 to support weight of heavy snow ice. the low grade sprinkler pipe is very thin walled and tends to bend, crack and break easily. also and schedule 40 couplings


cheryl aker
5/29/2012 9:14:04 PM

Great ideas! I look forward to learning more about your raised bed boxes. Do the pvc frames just set inside the boxes? Do you secure them in any way so they don't get blown over? Great way to have mini-greenhouses to extend your season!


tim smith
5/25/2012 10:46:47 PM

While I like the idea, it seems expensive. Is it? I have what's called a "hoop coop" for my chickens, but part of it is run which is covered with clear plastic and could be used for a green house if not for the heat it holds. While the coop is only covered with a couple of tarps, strangely enough the rooster is the only one of all the roosters who did not sustain frost bite to his comb. It's made with 16x50 cattle panel s and the length can be as long as you want.


nebraska dave
4/27/2012 1:54:03 AM

Allan, you are quite the homestead garden engineer. It really is amazing how much can be build from PCV pipe. It has expanded way beyond simple plumbing needs. Of course I always knew there were adapters from PCV to regular pipe but last two years ago I discovered that there was a PCV adapter to connect a hose. I'm not certain why but regular pipe threads and hose threads are not the same. I also discovered that the cap from a 20 ounce plastic soda bottle has the same threads as a hose. I use them for caps on my gravity feed watering system when different setups are needed. Have a great day with building rabbit inhibiting fences.





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