Make Extra Money on Your Land

Turn your acres of pasture and timber into extra income.


| January/February 2016



Firewood

Selling timber helps keep land clear while making extra income.

Photo by Perry Mastrovito

Eric Dahlberg knows a thing or two about making a buck off his land. The New York native has several businesses in place that are helping him earn a living from his properties. His plots are located in the southeastern part of the state, on the edge of Schoharie County where it joins Albany and Greene Counties. All told, he owns, rents and manages more than 300 acres.

“I’ve got 93 acres in the main spot. The gravel pit has 22 acres, and I have a few others,” he says. “On my land I’ve got about 30 acres of pasture. The main farm has two houses, a cabin and a sawmill. We rent out the cabin, and we do some recreation on our land.”

The land is on the edge of the New York City Watershed, helping to protect the safe drinking water for 9 million people – about half the population of New York state. “One of the farms I rent is owned by the New York City Department of Environmental Protection. They own a fair chunk of land in this area, and they’re constantly buying land to protect the watershed. That’s how we got involved in this,” he added.

Dahlberg knows the area well. He grew up on a farm just a few miles down the road. It’s a place with rolling hillsides, open vistas, and beauty at nearly every turn. “I can look out my living room window and see about 20 miles away,” he says. “I’m about 2-1/2 hours outside of New York City.” It’s close enough to take a day trip to the Big Apple, if someone had a mind to. It’s also far enough away to enjoy a quieter and more pastoral lifestyle in a rural setting – dial-up Internet connections and all.

A rough and rocky landscape

“The area is very hilly,” he says. “I can see the lights from the local ski slope and a mountain behind it with one of the highest vertical ski slopes in the East.”

“Years ago, our forests were either clearcut for farming or selectively harvested for the best timber,” says Dahlberg. Hemlock bark was also harvested for local tanneries. Tannersville and Prattsville nearby had some of the largest tanneries in the Northeast.





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