Treat Your Family to Great No-Bake Cookies Recipes

Several variations for no-bake cookies recipes are easy to make, plus this recipe box includes recipes for corned steak, pizza burgers and water pie.

| May/June 2013

  • No-Bake Oatmeal Cookies
    Boiled Oatmeal Cookies are the quintessential no-bake cookie, and they taste great, too.
    Photo By iStockphoto/Diane Labombarbe

  • No-Bake Oatmeal Cookies

As the temperatures start to rise, we begin looking for ways to stay cool, and that goes double for kitchen duty. Your family may clamor for cookies, but you would really prefer to not turn on the oven. What do you do?

No-bake cookies are the answer. Some call them preacher cookies, or no-bakes, or cow patties, or poodgies, or … well, you get the idea.

Many variations exist, though the main no-bake recipe contains cocoa, peanut butter, oats, sugar, butter, vanilla and milk. For another example, those puffed cereal squares your children love to make and eat are the epitome of no-bake treats.

No-bake cookie recipes do not contain flour or eggs, and they usually contain some type of fruit or nuts, held together by a sugar like honey or a fat like peanut butter. The mixture is then either pressed into a pan, cooled and cut into squares or bars, or dropped by the spoonful onto a sheet of waxed paper spread over a jellyroll pan, and then refrigerated or frozen. Some, like Boiled Oatmeal Cookies, are cooked on the stovetop, mainly to dissolve things, then cooled before eating.



It’s difficult to trace the history of such a novel yet simple cookie. Early recipes date back to the 1930s, while the concept — but no recipes — may be traced back to ancient Middle Eastern cooks, who put together various concoctions of seeds, nuts, dried fruit and sweeteners for travelers to carry during their journeys.

The idea of no-bake cookies is as simple as the cookie. It’s a recipe that can be thrown together in a hurry for unexpected guests or short-notice get-togethers. The story behind the name “preacher cookies” says it was so named because a housewife, upon looking out her window and seeing the preacher coming up the mountain on his horse, could quickly whip up a batch of cookies to be cooling when the preacher arrived at the door.



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