Barn Quilts, Recycled Chicken Coop and Tomatoes

Share our readers’ experiences making barn quilts, building chicken coops and brooders, and growing tomatoes.

| July/August 2016

  • The making of a barn quilt.
    Photo by R. Thomas Berner
  • This photo was taken at one of the workshops offered by Glenn and Barbara Gross, of Emlenton, Pennsylvania.
    Photo by R. Thomas Berner
  • To get more information on the workshops we talked about in “Bridging the Gap With Barn Quilts,” send an email to Barbara Gross at barbgro@gmail.com.
    Photo by R. Thomas Berner
  • Madison, 14, wanted some chickens of her own, so, she researched the topic and set out to make it happen.
    Photo courtesy Christina Jones
  • Do-it-yourself chick brooder from Madison, 14, in Mississippi.
    Photo courtesy Christina Jones
  • Do-it-yourself chick brooder from Madison, 14, in Mississippi.
    Photo courtesy Christina Jones
  • The West Union Covered Bridge in Indiana was built in 1876.
    Photo by Dustin Wright
  • A photograph of the West Union Covered Bridge in Indiana, shot by drone.
    Photo by Dustin Wright

Barn Quilts  

I was delighted when I received my May/June issue of Grit, and it had an article on barn quilts (Barn Quilts Bridge the Gap). I, too, paint barn quilts. I have sewn and quilted many projects in my life, but painting barn quilts has been the most fun. I have painted more than 25, and have sold many of them.

Two years ago, I remodeled a sun porch. It was painted in green, orange and yellow, and trimmed in dark gray. I have taken these four colors and painted 24-inch barn quilts for the wall. They are awesome, and each quilt is a different pattern.

I am getting ready to do a 36-inch triangle pattern for the front of my house. It will have four triangles: red, blue, green and yellow. I have one in my bedroom in the Ohio Star pattern, in colors of a Pendleton Chief Joseph Blanket. It’s orange and turquoise with a tan background.

I live on a 1-acre homestead in town, growing mostly berries for the farmers’ market. I have blueberries, blackberries, gooseberries and goji berries. I started 67 goji berry plants last summer, but it looks like the rabbits ate all of them this winter. I still have the original six plants to play with though. I also have a vegetable garden and grow hostas and daylilies.



I receive several of your Ogden Publications magazines, and they have taught me so much – thank you for that. I was even able to attend one of the MOTHER EARTH NEWS FAIRS several years ago. They are so informative, and it’s fun to see the people you read about. I got to listen to Joel Salatin, Bryan Welch and Hank Will speak, and I even got to talk with Diane Whealy of Seed Savers. She started Seed Savers about 60 miles from where I live.

Please keep up the great work passing all this valuable knowledge on to us. I do so appreciate all of the information. Even though I’m 67 years old, there is so much out there to learn.





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