Dakota Notebook


Healthy Homemade Bread

Healthy home-made bread

So why invest in the habit?

For starters, your homemade bread will be fresher than any loaf you purchase in a store.You’ll also avoid this myriad of chemicals often used in commercial breads:

  • Potassium bromate – improves rising and gives bread greater volume.
  • Azodicarbonamide (ADA) – dough conditioner
  • Partially hydrogenated oil – a trans fat (linked to “bad” cholesterol)
  • Sugar – a preservative
  • Monoglycerides and diglycerides – make the bread softer, prevents it from going stale
  • Butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) – preservative to prevent rancidity
  • Sodium – salt (generally higher amounts than your homemade recipe)
  • Carmel coloring
  • High fructose corn syrup – less common today
  • Soy – keeps water and oil from separating among other things

As consumers become more interested in healthy eating, there are more commercial breads that contain fewer preservatives/additives. However, making your own bread gives you the most control over ingredients.

That control includes the use of fresh, high quality ingredients. You can be certain your whole grain flours are 100% whole grain – especially when you grind your own grain.

Organic flours are more available and affordable than ever, as are organic versions of nearly every ingredient you may want to use in a bread recipe.

Typically, the cost of a loaf of homemade bread using organic ingredients is less than $1.00. In a two-pound loaf of bread, there are some 12 slices, at less than 10-cents per slice.

On the economic side of home-made bread, your delicious, nutritious and economical loaves can serve as a main ingredient in meals consisting of French toast, grilled cheese sandwiches, toast and nut butter, etc.

By making your own bread, you can easily modify recipes to add nutritious and tasty ingredients such as seeds – flax, sunflower, poppy, sesame, etc. You can use eggs, milk, honey or maple syrup, herbs and other flavorings.

Generally, home-made bread tastes better than any commercial loaf.

If you’re concerned about the time required to bake your own bread, you might consider purchasing a basic bread machine. Often, used bread machines are available for as little as $10. New ones can cost less than $50. Since you’re saving at least $2 per loaf of bread, you’ll quickly recover the cost of your machine – and eat better!

Using a bread machine and my recommended dough prep process, you can invest about 25 total minutes to produce a two-pound loaf in as little as two hours.

More than likely you’ll have leftover pieces of bread. Slice and dry them to maintain a nutritious bread crumb supply to use for cooking foods such as meat loaf, fried meats, etc. A grater or food processor works great to shred the dry slices.

Bake several loaves of bread in one day and store in the freezer (or refrigerator, depending on how quickly you’ll use them). Make your own garlic toast, bread sticks, even sweet rolls. You’ll be pleasantly surprised at how fast and easy it is to produce your own bread and improve your health and nutrition!


Longtime journalist Loretta Sorensen is the author of, “Secrets To Baking Your Best Bread Ever!” and regularly shares recipes and information about bread baking on her website.

You’ll find her book on Amazon, Barnes and Noble and in the Country Store. Her weekly bread baking posts are featured at “Mother Earth Living,” “Grit Magazine,” Facebook (Secrets to Baking Your Best Ever), Twitter @bakeyourbestever and Pinterest at “Secrets to Baking Your Best Bread Ever.”

WHY BAKE YOUR OWN BREAD?

What are some reasons you may want to consider making your own bread?

One primary motivator for me is the elimination of any chemical preservatives, coloring, flavor, etc. that is often found in commercial breads. Even though there are many more whole grain options on the bread shelf, if the first ingredient in that bread doesn’t say “100% whole wheat” or “100% whole grain,” you can’t be sure the product actually contains all three parts of whole grain (WebMD) and you may find a listing of numerous preservatives, flavor enhancers, etc.

Bread color is not a guarantee that the product is whole grain either. Many commercial breads contain artificial coloring. If “wheat flour” is not listed as a primary ingredient, it’s likely that it was made with processed white flour.

HOMEMADE BREAD

Health benefits of whole grains include low in fat and cholesterol free; plant protein, loads of fiber, resistant starch, minerals vitamins, etc. When you make your own bread, you have much more control over the quality and freshness of the grain you use.

 Commercial bakery-style breads made with authentic whole grain flavors and organic products are expensive. By making your own bread, you can use a store-brand organic all-purpose flour and produce a loaf of bread for around $2.00. Even if you make white bread, you can obtain organic flour and eliminate artificial flavor, color, and preservatives and make bread for about $1.00 per loaf.

In searching for flour sources, you may discover local or regional flour millers that can supply the types and quantities of flour you require at reasonable prices. Purchasing baking supplies from sources you know are reliable is valuable in itself.

Once you make homemade bread, you’ll realize that the flavor, texture, and overall appeal of homemade bread makes it well worth the effort to make it at home. Today’s breadmakers and bread machines make bread baking so easy you may wonder why you didn’t start baking bread sooner!

One other tool available to home bread makers today can make bread baking a simple task. The habit of warming a bread recipe liquid (milk and water) to a temperature range between 105 and 110-degrees (Fahrenheit) almost guarantees a successful loaf time after time.

Pairing the precision of the digital thermometer with the efficiency of a bread machine – which thoroughly kneads the dough and stimulates the necessary gluten structure – gives bread makers the perfect “recipe” for baking success.

Once you’re in the habit of baking your own bread, you’ll find the economy of the bread makes it a sensible choice for making French toast, your own stuffing and bread crumbs, sweet rolls, dinner rolls, and more! All of these products will also be free of added chemicals and preservatives, provide wonderfully fresh flavor, and add to your family’s nutrition.

Access to online products makes it easier than ever to obtain the type(s) of flours or whole grains you need for bread baking. Most of today’s high-powered blenders will grind small amounts of grain at one time. One loaf of bread typically requires about 3.5 cups of flour.

Freezing flours and whole grains is also simple. Just be sure to label everything to ensure you know what you’re using and how long you’ve stored it.

Perhaps the question about making homemade bread should be, “Why NOT make homemade bread?”


Find more of Loretta Sorensen’s recipes, bread baking tips, bread-making videos and her book at www.bakeyourbestever.comand YouTube Channel “Bake Your Best Ever.” Her book, Secrets To Baking Your Best Bread Ever! contains recipes and a wealth of baking pointers. Follow her on Facebook and Pinterest (Secrets To Baking Your Best Bread Ever).

cover

Mother Earth News Bread

Roll up your sleeves, warm up your oven, and find a new favorite bread with help from the recipes found in Mother Earth News Bread!

The timeless allure of fresh bread has been part of MOTHER EARTH NEWSmagazine since 1970, when they published their first issue. In Bread, the editors have collected their very best recipes and techniques. You'll find all the classics, including rustic white, whole-wheat sandwich bread, and sourdough. There's plenty of quick-breads and page after page of country and holiday favorites, such as skillet cornbread, Irish soda bread, and fruit- and nut-filled harvest breads. Go beyond the traditional and try your hand at flatbreads, boiled breads, naan, bagels, pizza crust … even gluten-free breads. With more than 150 tried-and-true recipes to choose from, you're sure to find new loaves to love.

12 Steps for Trouble Shooting Bread Dough

Loretta SorensenIf you’re just beginning your bread baking adventures, you may benefit from understanding a few basic facts about what contributes to producing a satisfactory loaf.

These basic principles are true of nearly all types of yeast breads.

  1. You must use fresh ingredients to achieve optimum results. This is true of nearly any type of recipe, but don’t sabotage your baking efforts by using flour or yeast that is more than one year old. If either of these ingredients hasn’t been stored correctly, it will have an undesirable taste and will likely not rise or bake as fresher ingredients will.
  2. Yeast thrives in a temperature range between 105- and 110-degrees (Fahrenheit). It will function down to a temperature of 90 degrees. However, its activity will be much slower, and it’s not nearly as likely to reach its potential for boosting your final bread rise. Use a digital thermometer (or any household thermometer) to warm your recipe liquid to this range.
  3. Temperatures over 115-degrees (Fahrenheit) will kill the yeast. This is desirable during baking, but not as the dough rises.
  4. When salt comes in direct contact with yeast, the yeast dies. Your bread requires salt as part of the rising process. However, your recipe’s salt should be blended with the flour to avoid direct contact with the yeast.
  5. Gluten in your flour is involved in your bread’s rise and the final texture of your loaf. It needs to be activated by the action of kneading. You can use a bread machine, mixer or knead by hand.
  6. The advantages of a bread machine include the fact that you can prepare and add all your ingredients and allow the machine to do the work. A machine can knead far more thoroughly than either a mixer or a person. The bread machine also helps maintain the warmth of your dough throughout the knead/rest/knead cycle.
  7. Regardless of your kneading preference, you should knead your dough no less than 10 minutes for each kneading cycle. Don’t knead it more than 18 minutes, as over-kneading will negatively affect gluten action and your final rise.
  8. If you bake your dough in the oven, you must coat the pan with a non-stick product such as butter, oil, aerosol spray, etc. Keep in mind that a baked loaf will readily stick to a glass pan and slip out of a metal pan more easily.
  9. The size of your bread pan will affect the rise of your loaf. A pan that is larger than 9x5 will produce a more-flat loaf. An ideal bread pan size (for a two-pound loaf) is 8.5 x 4.5.
  10. During the final rise, give yeast every opportunity to reach its greatest height by keeping it in an environment (your oven is ideal) at a temperature of at least 80 degrees and not more than 120 degrees (Fahrenheit). Don’t keep your oven on during the rise. Just warm it prior to setting the dough inside it.
  11. Cool your bread on a cooling rack. If necessary, use a makeshift (rack) by suspending the bread over a pan or between a couple packages of food, etc. Otherwise, the bottom of your loaf will be soggy.
  12. Consider using a bread keeper stored in your refrigerator (because bags in the refrigerator can gather moisture.) 

Find more of Loretta Sorensen’s recipes, bread baking tips, bread-making videos and her book at Bake Your Best Ever Bread. Her book, Secrets To Baking Your Best Bread Ever! contains recipes and a wealth of baking pointers. Follow her on Facebook and Pinterest (Secrets To Baking Your Best Bread Ever).

BREAD MACHINE RYE BREAD

Loretta SorensenHomemade Rye Bread Tips

Rye has many health benefits, and rye bread has a wonderful flavor – especially when it’s paired with cheese!

For all these reasons, I’ve worked hard to develop a satisfactory two-pound Bread Machine Rye Bread recipe.

The first thing I learned in my experiments is that I don’t like 100% rye bread. The rye flavor is too strong for me and the lack of gluten in the bread causes it to be quite heavy. 

My solution to those issues was simple: use a blend of white wheat and rye flour, with slightly more wheat than rye. And since rye flour has less gluten than wheat, I add 1 Tablespoon of wheat gluten to get a nice rise. If you prefer a heavier bread, you an omit the gluten. For a greater rye flavor, simply use a greater ratio of rye to wheat flour.

As always, I use my signature digital thermometer method to warm recipe liquid to a specific temperature range so my yeast has what it needs to work.

ryebread

Bread-Machine Rye Bread Recipe

Equipment:

  • 2- to 3-quart mixing bowl
  • 2-cup measuring utensil
  • Tablespoon
  • Measuring cups, from 1/4-cup size on up to 1-cup
  • Whisk or fork
  • Digital thermometer
  • Bread machine
  • Bread pan
  • Spatula
  • Butter, oil or no-stick spray to coat bread pan

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/4 cups water, ranging from 105 to 110 degrees
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons yeast
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1 Tablespoon gluten
  • 2 1/4 – 2 1/2 cups 100% white wheat flour (red wheat will produce a coarser loaf)
  • 1 3/4 cup 100% rye flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt (I recommend Himalayan pink salt)
  • 2 Tablespoons of melted butter or oil
  • 2 Tablespoons molasses 

Method:

If necessary (typically during the winter months), use hot tap water to heat your measuring utensil and bread machine canister before preparing your bread dough. This usually takes just a few minutes once the hot water is placed in the utensil. Pour the water out before measuring your ingredients. 

Place 1 1/4 cups of hot tap water in 2-cup measuring utensil. Add the sugar and stir it thoroughly to blend it with the water. Check the water’s temperature. If it’s below 105 degrees (Fahrenheit), warm 1 or 2 Tablespoons of the liquid on your stove top to boost the yeast mixture’s overall temperature (105-110 degrees); if too hot, allow it to cool for a few minutes. Once the mixture is within the desired temperature range, add the yeast and stir to dissolve it.

Allow the yeast mixture to rest for about 3 minutes. It will form a foamy “head” to indicate that the yeast is activated.

While you wait for the yeast, blend dry ingredients. In a large mixing bowl, measure flour, gluten and salt. Sift the ingredients together using a whisk or a fork. 

If using butter, melt it slightly or cut into small pieces so it blends thoroughly with your dough.

Once your yeast mixture is ready, pour out the water used to heat the bread machine canister. Carefully pour the yeast mixture into the pan, using a spatula to clear the measuring cup. Carefully add the flour mixture to the canister. Pour the oil or softened/chopped butter and the molasses on top of the flour. Select your machine settings and start the mixing/kneading process.

My bread machine completes a cycle of mix/knead (10-18 minutes), rest (20 minutes), mix/knead (10-18 minutes).  Observe the dough as it mixes. It should pull away from the side of the canister. If it doesn’t, it’s too sticky. Add flour 1-2 Tablespoons at a time until it forms a solid ball.

Before the last part of the dough cycle completes, prepare your bread pan. If necessary, warm the pan before coating it (spraying with a non-stick product, insert parchment, etc.).

Once the dough cycle is completed, gently place the dough into the coated bread pan, cover it and place it in a warm area (I use my oven, which I heat to close to as warm as 120 degrees). It will take 30-45 minutes for the dough to rise.

Once the dough is raised, place it in a preheated 350-degree (Fahrenheit) oven to bake for 30-45 minutes or until the crust is nicely browned. Remove from the oven and immediately place on a cooling rack. Try to give it some time to cool before you cut any slices! 

Once it’s completely cooled, store the bread in a plastic bag. In summer, home-made bread quickly spoils and should be refrigerated once it’s cooled.


Find more of Loretta Sorensen’s recipes, bread baking tips and her book at www.bakeyourbestever.com. Her recent book, Secrets To Baking Your Best Bread Ever! contains recipes and a wealth of baking pointers. Follow her onFacebook and Pinterest (Secrets To Baking Your Best Bread Ever).

FLAX IN YOUR BREAD RECIPE

Those tiny flax seeds provide a powerhouse of nutrients that can boost nutrition in your homemade breads. 

You can replace either flour or eggs in your bread recipe with ground flax meal or whole flax seed. When using whole seed, soak it in water for a few hours before you use it. 

What does flaxseed add to your bread? 

Flax seed facts:

  • 40% fat (the healthy kind!)
  • 28% dietary fiber (beneficial for your colon)
  • 21% protein
  • 6% carbohydrates

The fat in flax is heart-healthy omega 3. As an excellent source of dietary fiber, flaxseed and flax meal contribute to colon health

The protein in flax is similar to soybean protein and helps vegetarians meet daily protein requirements.

Here’s a method to use flax meal as an egg replacement:

  • 1 Tablespoon of finely ground flaxseed
  • 3 Tablespoons of water

Soak seed in the water several hours and whisk briskly just before adding to your recipe.

To add flax meal to your bread, replace flour with flax meal. Since flax meal reduces the amount of gluten in your yeast bread, I recommend substituting ¼ cup of flax meal for ¼ cup of flour.

Here’s a recipe to get you started!

FLAXSEED

Equipment:

  • 2- to 3-quart mixing bowl
  • 2-cup measuring utensil
  • Tablespoon
  • Measuring cups, from ¼-cup size on up to 1-cup
  • Whisk or fork
  • Digital thermometer
  • Bread machine
  • Bread pan
  • Spatula
  • Butter, oil or no-stick spray to coat bread pan

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/4 cups water, ranging from 105 to 110 degrees
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons yeast
  • 1/4 cup sugar, honey or maple syrup
  • 3 1/4 to 3 1/2 cups 100% whole wheat flour (I recommend white wheat for the flavor)
  • 1/4 cup finely ground flax meal
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt (I recommend Himalayan pink salt)
  • 2 Tablespoons of melted butter or oil

Method:

1. If necessary (typically during the winter months), use hot tap water to heat your measuring utensil and bread machine canister before preparing your bread dough. This usually takes just a few minutes once the hot water is placed in the utensil. Pour the water out before measuring your ingredients. 

2. Place 1 1/4 cups of hot tap water in 2-cup measuring utensil. If you’re using refrigerated syrup or honey, it will significantly cool the water’s temperature. Once you’ve added the sweetener and stirred it thoroughly to blend it with the water, check the water’s temperature. If it’s too cold, heat 1 or 2 Tablespoons (stove top) to boost the liquid’s overall temperature (105-110 degrees); if too hot, allow it to cool for a few minutes. Once the mixture is within the desired temperature range, add the yeast and stir to dissolve it.

3. Allow the yeast mixture to rest for 3-5 minutes. It will form a foamy “head” to indicate that the yeast is activated.

4. While you wait for the yeast, blend your dry ingredients. In a large mixing bowl, measure flour, gluten and salt. Sift the ingredients together using a whisk or a fork.

5. If using butter, melt it slightly or cut into small pieces so it blends thoroughly with your dough. 

6. Once your yeast mixture is ready, pour out the water used to heat the bread machine canister. Carefully pour the yeast mixture into the pan, using a spatula to clear the measuring cup. Carefully add the flour mixture to the canister. Pour the oil or softened/chopped butter on top of the flour. Select your machine settings and start the mixing/kneading process.

7. An effective cycle is knead 10-18 minutes/rest 20 minutes/knead 10-18 minutes.

8. Before the second cycle completes, prepare your bread pan. If necessary, warm the pan before coating it (spraying with non-stick product, insert parchment, etc.).

9. Once the second kneading cycle is done, gently place the dough into the coated bread pan, cover it and place it in a warm area (I use my oven, which I heat to close to as warm as 120 degrees). It will take 30-45 minutes for the dough to raise.

10. Once the dough is raised, place it in a pre-heated 350-degree oven to bake for 30-45 minutes or until the crust is nicely browned. Remove from the oven and immediately place on a cooling rack. Try to give it some time to cool before you cut any slices!

11. Once it’s completely cooled, store the bread in a plastic bag. In summer, home-made bread quickly spoils and should be refrigerated once it’s cooled.


Long time journalist Loretta Sorensen is the author of Secrets To Baking Your Best Bread Ever! and regularly shares information about whole grains and bread baking. You’ll find her book on her blog site at www.bakeyourbestever.com, Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and the Country Store at Our Dakota Horse Tales. Her weekly bread baking posts are featured at Mother Earth LivingGRIT MagazineOur Dakota Horse Tales, and on Pinterest, and Facebook.

PANS: A MATTER OF SIZE

Loretta SorensenIt can be difficult to determine why bread doesn’t raise like you want it to. One surprising reason is that your pan may be too large.

Since I’m not a chef and learned all my cooking skills either at my mother’s elbow or through trial and error, I had no idea that some loaf pans aren’t really suitable for baking a two-pound loaf of bread. Until I started experimenting with my bread machine.

The front loaf in this photo clearly didn't rise as high as the second because it was baked in a 9x5 loaf pan. The second was in a pan measuring 8.5x4.5. 

One-and-one-half pound and two-pound loaves are typically what you bake in a bread machine. Flour amounts for these recipes are generally 4 cups or less. This produces a good-sized loaf that will easily provide at least 12 slices of bread.

If your recipe calls for 5, 6 or even 7 cups of flour, you can – and will want to – use a larger loaf pan.

PAN_SIZE
Photo by Loretta Sorensen

The  pans I use for my two-pound loaves are 8.5 inches long and 4.5 inches wide. For two-pound loaves, this size causes the dough to rise into a nice dome shape and gives the bread a light, soft texture.

If your don't have an 8.5x4.5 pan and purchasing a new pan is out of the question (at least for the time being), it doesn’t mean you can’t bake bread. Just know that your loaf may not turn out exactly as you hope.

If you need to replace your loaf pan(s), you may be able to do so very inexpensively (I’m not fond of the word cheap) by searching for a new pan at a thrift store, rummage sale or clearance sale. In doing so, I recommend avoiding glass or even Corning Ware, as bread dough sticks to these surfaces very easily, even when the pan is well coated with a non-stick product.

I also don’t advise use of pans with a non-stick surface. If that surface is damaged, undesirable toxins could potentially leach into your bread.

Aluminized steel pans are my favorite type of loaf pan. They are designed with a corrugated finish to be durable and provide a virtually non-stick surface without any added chemical coating. Aluminized steel loaf pans cost more than other types of pans. However, I’ve never had to dig a loaf of bread out of my aluminized steel pans. They do need a non-stick coating each time I bake, but they work wonderfully well. 

Because these pans quickly heat and hold the heat, I’ve never had a loaf of bread that was soggy in the middle because it didn’t cook thoroughly.

Since saving money is one of the main reasons most people bake bread, it makes sense not to go overboard on the cost of the pans we use. However, since my two-pound loaves of 100% organic bread costs about $1.50 to make, I’m saving a minimum of $2 to $4 per loaf each time I bake. Over a one-year period, my minimum savings is $104 ($2 x 52 weeks). That means I quickly recover the $15 cost of my bread pan, which has a lifetime guarantee.

Whichever loaf pan you choose to use – even a 9x5 size - just be aware that it will affect the final rise of your bread.


Long time journalist Loretta Sorensen is the author of Secrets To Baking Your Best Bread Ever! and regularly shares information about whole grains and bread baking. You’ll find her book on her blog site at www.bakeyourbestever.com, Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and the Country Store at Our Dakota Horse Tales. Her weekly bread baking posts are featured at Mother Earth LivingGRIT MagazineOur Dakota Horse Tales, and on Pinterest, and Facebook.

YEAST: IT'S ALIVE!

Loretta Sorensen

Since failed yeast action is often the cause of poorly raised bread, master your understanding of how yeast works, and your home-made bread will always be outstanding! And understanding yeast is really quite simple.

IMG_0030
Photo by Loretta Sorensen

Fact #1: Yeast is a living organism. Freezing temperatures don’t harm dry yeast, which is why it remains fresh in your freezer for a long time. Fresh yeast, usually found in the form of a refrigerated bar, is very uncommon anymore, has a very short life and doesn’t improve bread quality or flavor (as bread baking experts will attest).

Fact #2: Temperatures over 115 degrees (Fahrenheit) will kill yeast.

Fact #3: Yeast thrives – is most active – in a temperature range between 105- and 110-degrees (Fahrenheit).

Fact #4: If yeast is “old,” or has been exposed to high ambient temperatures or moisture, its ability to break down sugar and produce carbon dioxide will be diminished or lost. Dry yeast left a room temperature loses its vitality within a couple of days. If refrigerated, dry yeast typically maintains its quality for 3 months. Dry yeast will stay fresh in a freezer for up to one year.

Fact #5: In storage of any kind, dry yeast must be sealed in an airtight container to preserve quality.

Fact #6: Yeast requires “food” in order to produce carbon dioxide, which is the gas that causes bread dough to inflate. The most common ingredients used in bread to feed yeast are sugar, honey and maple syrup.

Fact #7: Too much sugar in a bread recipe will cause a loaf to be flat and dense. That’s because the sugar and yeast compete for the water in the recipe. Without adequate water, yeast cannot break down the sugar and produce carbon dioxide. Flour/sugar ratios in a bread dough recipe should not exceed ½ cup sugar for every 4 cups of flour. If the sugar/flour ratio is higher than this, additional yeast (one packet) will be needed to achieve the desired rise.

Fact #8: When yeast comes in direct contact with salt, it will die. Salt in a bread recipe must be blended with the flour to avoid bringing it into direct contact with the yeast.

Fact #9: Unless you are delaying a mix/knead cycle in your bread machine, your dough rise will be much more satisfactory if you mix your yeast in recipe liquid that’s warmed to the 105- to 110-degree (Fahrenheit) range. If you activate the yeast this way, you must immediately implement the mix/knead cycle.

Fact #10: Once the yeast has been mixed into the bread dough ingredients, it requires a warm environment so it can continue to feed on the recipe sweetener and produce carbon dioxide. A warmed oven (up to 120 degrees) provides an ideal location for raising bread.

As you improve your yeast-handling skills, you may be tempted to push your bread dough to more lofty heights. Don’t do it!

You can over-proof your bread before baking it, which means it could fall as it heats up. Once you learn how to manage yeast, you’ll be able to complete your final rise in 30 minutes (I promise!) and enjoy loaf after loaf of perfect home-made bread!


Long time journalist Loretta Sorensen is the author of Secrets To Baking Your Best Bread Ever! and regularly shares information about whole grains and bread baking. You’ll find her book on her blog site at www.bakeyourbestever.com, Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and the Country Store at Our Dakota Horse Tales. Her weekly bread baking posts are featured at Mother Earth LivingGRIT MagazineOur Dakota Horse Tales, and on Pinterest, and Facebook.







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