Sheep Shearing and Other Farming Lessons


| 4/15/2010 12:18:20 PM


Tags: Sheep, Shearing sheep,

A portrait of the author, Colleen Newquist.At long last, a “real” farming experience. I drove out to Three Fates Farm last Sunday in what seemed like proper sheep-shearing gear: long underwear, old jeans, hiking boots, a couple layers of shirts and a fleece jacket. Previous visits to the farm clued me in to the wind that whips across the open fields with vigorous velocity. With the temperature hovering at a damp 40 degrees, I was prepared for the barn to be chilly.

Owner Karen Askounis was ready when I arrived around noon. Three Jacob sheep were penned in the barn, awaiting their turns at the electric clippers. Karen rounded up the first girl, Patty, and tethered her in place on a clean piece of painted plywood—a political billboard for Illinois Congresswoman Debbie Halvorson, which I found amusing. Since she represents a largely rural district, I’m guessing she wouldn’t mind. Might even make a good photo op: Helping farmers and the environment at the same time!

The shearing of a Jacob sheep begins.

Clippers plugged in, sheep in place, we were ready to get started. I use “we” loosely here. The first thing I learned is that Karen is completely capable of shearing on her own, but is nice enough to let me hang around and “help” in the way that, say, a five-year-old might, peppering her with a hundred questions, petting Vicki the mastiff when she’d lumber in to observe, bagging the fleece for her, and sweeping up between sheep, so I could feel somewhat useful.

The bicolor fleece of Jacob sheep is a favorite for some spinners.



Watching Karen deftly handle her livestock was humbling. She had no problem flopping Patty on her back when she was stubbornly stamping and fussing, a move that immediately subdued her and let Karen finish shearing her belly. For me, touching the sheep at all was a new experience – one that I liked. I felt a little less timid around the creatures, more confident that I could get accustomed to handling an animal without fear of hurting them, or myself. But watching Karen trim the hooves of one sheep while she had her tethered, I felt the doubt creep in. How do you know if you’re trimming enough, or too much? How can you tell if you’re trimming evenly? How do you know if you’re hurting them?

Nebraska Dave
4/26/2010 3:57:54 PM

Colleen, if you are serious about sending a poetry book by Ted Kooser here's an email address to request my snail mail address. dbentz24@q.com


Nebraska Dave
4/25/2010 10:55:38 PM

Colleen, I can’t say that I’ve ever read any of Ted Kooser poetry. He must really write some good poetry for you to want to send me a book. I never was much of a fan of poetry but if you send it to me I promise to read it. I’ve been finding in these later years of life that to revisit those things that never appealed to me in my youth is a good thing. I have learned that many things that were not appealing to me back then I quite enjoy now. Maybe this could be one of those things to try again.


Mountain Woman
4/24/2010 6:21:19 AM

Colleen, Thanks for the book suggestion. I love reading and always have a book with me so I'm off to find this one.







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