50 Fall Hunting Tips

Enjoy your best season yet with hunting tips from this guide to hunting deer, turkeys, dove, pheasant, geese and ducks.

| September 2012

  • Deer Hunting
    #131. The Ultimate Local Food. If you’re into organic, local health food, killing a deer yourself is the way to eat.
    Photo By Fotolia/Bruce MacQueen
  • Hoof Prints
    Elk tracks look like very large deer tracks, and a mature bull’s prints will be much larger than those left by female or juvenile elk.
    Photo Courtesy Skyhorse Publishing
  • Fall Hunting Tips
    “1001 Hunting Tips” by Lamar Underwood and Nate Matthews focuses on the game species that most people hunt with tips for beginner and seasoned hunters alike.
    Cover Courtesy Skyhorse Publishing
  • Elk Hunting
    #174. Always quarter and remove the hide as soon as possible after you shoot a large animal, such as an elk. Otherwise its massive body will not lose heat quickly enough to prevent the meat from spoiling in all but the coldest weather.
    Photo By Fotolia/Jean-Edward Rozey
  • Duck Hunting
    #602. Don’t Be a “Skybuster.” A “skybuster” is the most hated person on any marsh or field where there’s duck or goose hunting. The skybuster blazes away at birds that are clearly out of range, thereby frightening the birds away from the area and ruining chances others might have had on the incoming birds.
    Photo By Fotolia/Michael Ireland
  • Pheasant Hunting
    #692. Out on the prairie, pheasants have limited roosting options. Find those roosts and you’ve got a wing-shooting gold mine early and late in the day.
    Photo By Fotolia/Michael Ireland
  • Wild Turkey Hunting
    #516. How do hunters miss a big target like a wild turkey standing within 30 yards? My personal pet theory (and I’ve done it myself!) is that the shooter is so enthralled by the scene before him that he raises his head from the gunstock just slightly. Do that, and you’ll miss every time.
    Photo By Fotolia/Bruce MacQueen
  • Goose Hunting
    #610. “To the avid waterfowler, no moment of truth can match the instant when a flock first responds to his call and decoys, the time when this wild, free bird of unsurpassed grace begins a descent from the sky down to gun range. It is a stirring spectacle . . .”
    Photo By Fotolia/Schlab
  • Dove Hunting
    #783. Perhaps the toughest shot in all upland gunning occurs when a dove, riding a tailwind, flying high, whips across your stand. Some of these birds actually rock their bodies from side-to-side, seemingly sensing your column of shot whistling past. This is prime-time, great shooting.
    Photo By iStockPhoto.com/Ashok Roorgues

  • Deer Hunting
  • Hoof Prints
  • Fall Hunting Tips
  • Elk Hunting
  • Duck Hunting
  • Pheasant Hunting
  • Wild Turkey Hunting
  • Goose Hunting
  • Dove Hunting

1001 Hunting Tips (Skyhorse Publishing, 2010) by Lamar Underwood and Nate Matthews is an all-encompassing and easy-to-read guide based on what these two outdoorsmen have learned after years of experience. Learn the best tactics, times to hunt, gear to bring and what to do once game has been taken with these nuggets of hunting wisdom, secrets and techniques. The following 50 hunting tips have been excerpted from the book. 

Deer hunting tips

#37. Hunt All Three Phases of the Rut 

A good deer hunter knows that there is not just one rut, but three. The first, called the pre-rut, occurs in early October, when mature, four- and five-year-old does first come into estrus. The second, known as the peak or primary rut, runs from late October to the last week of November, and is when the majority of female deer come into heat. The third, called the post-rut or late rut, takes place twenty-eight days after the end of the primary rut, as does that were not bred during October and November come back into estrus. These pre- and post-rut phases do not last long. Look for a sudden explosion of fresh buck sign, then hunt hard for several days using techniques, such as rattling, that take advantage of the increased aggression triggered by competition for a limited number of willing does.

#49. Let Blood Color Tell You How Fast to Follow a Wounded Buck 



Blood trails don’t just tell you the direction a wounded deer is moving. They can also provide good information about where on its body you shot the animal, and how quickly you should follow its trail. Bright red blood is full of oxygen and often means you’ve hit your deer in the lungs. Deer hit this way don’t go far, so you can pursue them quickly. Dark red or purple blood may indicate a gut shot. If you find such blood, particularly in conjunction with bits of intestinal fat, and there’s no precipitation forecast that could wash away or obscure the trail, consider giving the animal time to bed down and stiffen up before looking for a follow-up shot. Gut-shot deer often run long distances if they’re chased immediately after being wounded.

#72. Set up Multiple Stands to Beat the Wind 

Sparky
9/30/2013 9:26:26 PM

Ya criticize the "city folk" with your superior attitude, aren't all ya'll country folk supposed to be all helpful and supportive of others looking to be self sufficient? AND then ya have the gall to call that hunting? I call it entrapment. hey, s'long as the freezers full.


skeets
9/30/2013 11:14:52 AM

Geee I would have thought everybody knew this stuff. Guess the city kids ain't as smart as they think. Guess I ll finish splitting wood and set up the feeder and set out salt block in the apple orchard. Figure I ll shoot mine off the back porch, that way I can have a hot cup of coffee and drag it back to the barn with the little tractor,,







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