My Backyard Chicken Flock


| 7/3/2014 8:46:00 AM


MaryAnnI wanted chickens for years before I got them. I had read that they were good for pest control and that sold me, especially when I found out they eat ticks and fleas. I was always hesitant to get them because I was afraid that they would draw coyotes into the yard and the coyote would kill my cat. I was also afraid the cat would go after the chickens. Paul had asked me to start collecting the eggs since I was there bottle feeding Ed (my cow) and the coops were just a short walk away. I told you I should have been wary when he so readily agreed to let me bottle feed Ed.

Anyway, I figured it would be a good experience to determine what went into caring for chickens and if I really wanted them at home. Turns out they basically care for themselves, feed, water and clean the coop are the extent of it.

After a year of tending the chickens at the farm, I’d decided that, yes, I did want them at home, especially when I found out the cat would not be a problem, so I started looking at coops. My hubby was going to build me one, but we’re not exactly on the same page when it comes to timing. I want it now, he gets around to it, eventually.

After much searching around I found one on Craigslist that included the coop and four hens. It wasn’t too far from home so we borrowed my father-in-law's truck and picked up the coop and hens. As far as I can tell I have a Sussex, White Plymouth, Barred Rock and Rhode Island Red. Of course, this is completely guessing although I’m fairly certain on the Barred Rock and Sussex, they are not too difficult to determine.

May



Our daughter Katie named the ladies. They were Lucie Chicken (after our cat), Katie Chicken, Mommy Chicken and Daddy Chicken. I did get her to agree on changing Mommy and Daddy to May and Noodle. I joke that Chicken Noodle is going to be the first in the soup pot, she is so difficult compared to the others.





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