Canning, Milking the Dexter and Sun Room Windows Plus Funny Farm Stories


| 8/3/2011 7:19:00 PM


Tags: Dexter Cattle, Biggers' Farm, Cabin, Samantha Biggers,

Samantha BiggersHarvest season is always a very busy time on the farm. It can be hard to keep up with the canning and everything else up at the same time. We have also started on the journey of keeping a family cow. Actually I suppose it started when we first went to visit Linda Lou when she was 8 weeks old. Now she is a grown cow and just had her first calf. He will be our first Dexter steer that is raised for beef. He is a very beautiful calf and would make a good herd sire but there is only so much demand for Dexter bulls.  We need to get some better pictures of him.

Walking Linda Lou Back from Being Milked 

New Dexter Bull Calf 

Just out walking the cow 

Linda Lou in her milk stock 

We have been canning a lot. I have used about every jar I can find at my house and my father's. So far we have done 41 quarts of pickles, 60 quarts of green beans, and 65 pints of jam all from the farm! We also have about 100 pints of pasture pork canned back in April. I still have to can tomatoes, apples, and chicken and broth this year. Thankfully those can all be done at different times. Tomatoes take me the longest because of the process I use. I take 100 lbs of tomatoes and Matt and I cut them up and run them through a food strainer to make sauce. We then cook this down for about 24 hours before canning it. That means each pint of marinara sauce contains about 3 ¼ lbs of tomatoes. I like to cook the water out because it takes less canning jars and less pressure canning plus you don't wind up with a big puddle of water at the bottom of your plate when eating pasta. Tomatoes are good sources of antioxidants and vitamins so I think it is good for Matt and I do consume the equivalent of 1 ½ lbs of tomatoes each at a meal in the winter. I get about 26 pints out of 100 lbs of tomatoes.

mary carton
8/9/2011 11:29:34 PM

Diva you'll need plenty of towels to sop up the slobber.


muck boot diva
8/9/2011 1:23:03 PM

I see a Great Pyrenees -- We want to get them when we finally have some sheep! Any pointers? MBD


nebraska dave
8/7/2011 9:08:54 AM

Samantha, thanks again for doing the promotion for Purina. I received my camera a couple days ago. I suppose now I'll have to figure out how to post up videos on my GRIT blog. I've never had a video camera before. This one seems to be simple to use even for an old guy. :0) I too have learned that there's nothing like doing the work on your house or car yourself if you can. It might take longer but it gets done the way I want it and not the way the contractor decides it should be done. I've always been a cheapskate and it has gotten me in trouble at times but I've always come away with knowledge learned and maybe a few more tools (big smile) for the next time. I have canned a few pickles this year and might get some tomatoes canned before the season is over. You say that you cook your tomatoes down to sauce for 24 hours. Do you do that inside your house? For me that would certainly heat up the kitchen and with the 100 degree days put a strain on the airconditioner. I have had thoughts about setting up an outside canning station before I launch into major future canning for the Urban Ranch. Have a great Biggers Farm day.


mary carton
8/6/2011 7:57:42 AM

Samantha I rec'd my camera. Thanks a lot. I'll have to confess now that the story on my Grit blog on July 14 wasn't the first time I had used the mad tiller on my water line. The story above was the first time and I did it again this year. Like I said, I'm dangerous with a 31 hp John Deere and a tiller. I used a licensed contractor to build my house. It cost over $25,000 to jack the house up and replace the flooring after it started falling into the crawl space and to correct things like the washer running into the wall instead of the septic tank and some other issues. They just don't care about their workmanship any more. Thanks again Mary





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