Grit Blogs > Homesteading with Mrs D

The Maytag Repairman Still Sleeps

By Robyn Dolan 


Tags: washing machine, belts, home repair,

Robyn DolanLiving 50 or so miles away from the nearest washing machine repairman, it pays to learn a little bit about mechanics in order to avoid despair when that inevitable washday disaster occurs. The other day I went to put my clothes in the dryer and found a sloshy brown mess. I tried the spin cycle, but when it stopped, the yucky brown water was still in there. I pulled out the soaking, dirty clothes and put them in buckets to carry to the bathtub where I rinsed them well and let them drain until I could squeeze out enough water to put them in the dryer. I then bailed the filthy water out of the washer and began moving it. A belt magically appeared on the floor. I lifted the washer and set it on blocks to peer underneath. There was a frayed belt which I removed and installed the new one, still wondering why I would have stored it under the machine. I tried the spin again, but the little bit of water in the bottom of the tub would not go away.

Laundry on the line.

Later on, I was explaining the situation to my uncle, a retired maintenance man. We figured it must be the water pump. He described where and what I was looking for and promised he would look at it if I would remove it and bring it by. Thus fortified, I returned home and once again blocked up the machine. I removed the front panel and recognized the water pump from my uncle’s description. No hoses appeared to be clogged, so I removed the pump and discovered a pulley. Putting 2 and 2 together, I reasoned that of course that was NOT a spare belt that I had found on the floor. My washer has 2 belts! One to turn the tub, and one to drive the water pump! Hope-filled, I re-installed the frayed belt, hoping it would last until I could get a new one. I hooked up the water pump, tightened up the belt, and gave the spin cycle another go. Success!! Relief. Mt. Washmore conquered.

Many homestead mehanical and plumbing issues are simple, especially if you are lucky enough to have a retired professional to advise you. Being willing to attempt simple repairs yourself can save you a bundle – not just money – also stress. And if successful, can boost your confidence and make you glad you chose to live “way out there.”