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How to Get the Most From Your Agricultural Equipment

James WhiteUnfortunately, getting the most out of the machines and equipment you buy for your farm isn’t as simple as forking over your money in exchange for the items.

While it’s true that you do have to buy the right machines for the jobs you have, you also need to know how to use your equipment and how to take care of it. With that knowledge, you can realize the highest returns on your investments.

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Let’s take a look at five ways you’ll get the most from your farm equipment:

  1. Don’t Buy More Equipment Than You Need

Though you might be tempted to buy the strongest, most powerful machines on the market, there’s a good chance you won’t need those kinds of juggernauts to get the job done on your property. For example, most could probably get by with a 25 to 30 horsepower tractor on a smaller farm that grows vegetables. On the other hand, grain farmers probably need machines that are powered by closer to 100 ponies.

In addition to spending more money than necessary by buying a machine that’s too big for your needs, you should also remember that the wrong piece of equipment will make it that much harder to get the job done. 

Also keep in mind the possibilities of using attachments for one main piece of equipment to do multiple jobs.

  1. Consider Used Equipment

There are certainly some instances where buying a new piece of agricultural equipment makes the most sense. In many cases, you will probably be able to find some very strong pieces of used agricultural equipment that will suit your needs.

Assuming you buy from a trustworthy vendor – you can even look for warranties on used machinery at some locations – you will be able to enjoy a used tractor or other piece of farm equipment for years to come. Obviously, used equipment is cheaper than new equipment. By buying some high-quality used machines, you can invest in a bigger fleet since you’ll have more money in your wallet.

  1. Check Tire Pressure

Just like you strive to drive your car when tires are inflated optimally – otherwise, at best, you will burn fuel inefficiently and wear your tires out prematurely – so too should you apply the same level of care to the tires on your farming equipment.

In order to be most effective out in the field, you might want to check your tire pressure every few weeks – or even every day – to make sure things are properly in place before putting in a full day’s work. That way, you can ensure that you will be most effective in your efforts.

  1. Store Your Machinery in a Safe Place

There’s nothing worse than wanting to use a piece of machinery only to find that it’s been vandalized, destroyed by the elements or even ruined by animals.

In order to protect your investments and make sure that you’re able to get your work done, it’s worth considering storing your agricultural equipment in garage or shed so that it is safe and secure. Maybe you don’t have the funds or the space to build a shed – not a problem. You could always invest in some custom tarps if you’d prefer.

  1. Stick to a Regular Maintenance Schedule

Just like you bring your car in to the mechanic every so often for things like oil changes and tune-ups, so too should you apply a similar level of care to your agricultural machinery.

After all, you want to get the best return on your investment, enjoying the fruits of its labors for years to come. By proactively taking care of your machine, you’re able to prevent structural damage from occurring as quickly – meaning your machinery will be reliable far into the future.

wesley
5/19/2015 7:36:42 AM

My concern (or complaint) is that many of the companies making smaller tractors have increased the horsepower while downsizing the size of the tractors. There are many makes and models with 30+ horsepower with a 1500 pound gross weight. They have far more power than they are capable of utilizing, and more importantly, utilizing safely.


stephiesmith92
5/18/2015 9:41:31 AM

Good post, and a good one to refer to when you're a beginner, or someone who's had industrial equipment for years and are looking for maintenance tips. One thing that a lot of people don't consider is buying used equipment. My grandfather had his own farm in Utah, and his bobcat lasted him decades. He took meticulous care in making sure they were used properly and maintained regularly. It makes a world of difference. Thanks for sharing. www.wrscottequipment.com