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Cub Cadet Announces New 1000 Series Lawn Tractors

By Hank Will, Editor-in-Chief

Tags: cub cadet, lawn, tractor, machines,

Building on the brand’s 47-year history of innovation and quality, Cub Cadet has taken the lawn tractor to the next level with its redesigned 1000 series. The Series 1000 lawn tractors include eight models with deck sizes ranging from 42 to 54 inches. These machines will be available at independent dealers, The Home Depot and Tractor Supply Co. in February 2009 with suggested retail prices ranging from $1,499 to $2,599 depending on engine and mowing deck width.

Cub Cadet 1000 Series Lawn Tractor

So what makes these new 1000 series tractors so special? According to the folks at Cub Cadet, all models in this lineup will be constructed around a 9-gauge steel frame, which is the thickest in the industry, and cast-iron front axles. The company feels so good about the quality of these machines that they are backed by a five-year limited warranty.

Cub Cadet engineers chose 19- to 25-horsepower Kohler power plants for their durability and exceptional performance. Kohler engines powered the very first Cub Cadets back in 1961 and have been available throughout the life of the brand. These new Series 1000 tractors also have a remarkably tight 12-inch turning radius, which makes them almost as versatile as a zero-turning-radius machine. I took out a piece of fence with a ZTR at a product demo day, so I really appreciate a tighter turning radius in a more conventional lawn tractor.

Cub Cadet’s innovative cutting system leaves no grass uncut, even in the tallest, thickest stand. All components in the cutting system – from deck to blades, from dome design to discharge chute – work together to ensure an unsurpassed quality of cut. Added strength and rigidity keep the high-lift blades from deflecting and flexing under heavy loads, severe conditions or high speeds. This deck creates a powerful vacuum and smooth, continuous airflow, the result of which is that every blade of grass is lifted and cut. Clippings are evenly propelled and distributed through an extra-wide discharge chute, disappearing into the lawn. No unsightly clumps, streaks or uncut grass are left behind.

I haven’t had my hands on one of these machines yet, but I can’t wait to demo one. I probably won’t trade any of my 20-something vintage Cub Cadets for a new one just yet, but it gets more tempting every year.

Hank Will raises hair sheep, heritage cattle and many varieties of open-pollinated corn with his wife, Karen, on their rural Osage County, Kansas farm. His home life is a perfect complement to his professional life as editor in chief at GRIT and Capper's Farmer magazines. Connect with him on .