Americans are Ready to Explore Hybrid Vehicles With Alternative Fuel Sources

The National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium's survey shows Americans are ready for the next step in vehicle evolution, all that is needed are reliable alternative fuel sources.

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The Toyota Highlander hybrid is one of the new breed of alternative cars.

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A survey finds Americans are ready for the next step in vehicle evolution and alternative fuel sources. 

The American consumers are ready. Now all we have to wait for are the alternative fuel sources.

The National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium undertook a survey that showed Americans find alternative fuels to be an important topic.

Ninety-three percent of those surveyed believe in the need for developing alternative fuel sources and, according to the survey, 55 percent of us would consider an alternative fuel vehicle the next time we go car shopping.

The survey, however, also found there are some major obstacles in the way of achieving what we all want. Some of those roadblocks are the low number of fueling stations available with alternative fuel, the cost of the high-tech vehicles, the lack of information available on such vehicles, and our general lack of knowledge on alternative fuel and vehicles.

Those surveyed indicated the willingness to pay the higher cost of the vehicles if they see the benefits: better fuel efficiency, tax breaks, less dependence on overseas sources of oil, less pollution and/or better health.

NAFTC promotes programs to lessen energy dependence and to develop use of cleaner transportation. Founded in 1992, it is the only such organization in the United States. Its headquarters are at West Virginia University, and there are training centers from coast to coast. For more details, visit the website at NAFTP.NRCCE.WVU.edu.