Grit Blogs > Howdy from Homeland Farm

Spring Projects at Homeland Farm

CarmenHello from Homeland Farm. This week brings a change in pace for us. Cliff is going to fly to Nevada for a few days to visit his son, daughter-in-law and their baby girl, so I will be head honcho here for the rest of the week. I look around and see a lot that needs to be done this spring.

The horses have stepped on a lot of wire to push it down so they can lean over it more conveniently, they like their comfort don’t ya know! We have 4 horses now – two Spotted Saddle Horse mares, and two Thoroughbred race horses we saved from an unpleasant future. We recently had a tremendous loss: We had to put down our old Belgian draft horse "Bill" to sleep after 5 years. We bought him from people that hadn't fed him in weeks ... skin and bones. They said he was 15 – turned out to be 35ish – but he was a great fella. I will put some videos of him on at a later date. We will miss him.

Horses in pasture

We also have 65 layers, and two guinea hens: Mr. and Mrs. Guinea. They are hot tickets and keep us amused with their travels. We have Rhode Island Reds, Araucanas, Buff Orpingtons, New Hampshire Reds and Barred Rocks, and one 5-year-old Araucana rooster, Mr. Rooster Cogburn.

We also have 2 dogs, Lacey the cheesedoodle poodle and Duchess a Golden Retriever, and we have 4 cats, Muffinhead, Stewbeef, Stink E Lewis, and Slippery Sue. We are going to be getting some turkey poults in June, for a very tasty Thanksgiving. We have plans to get our garden under way once Cliff gets back from Nevada, and of course lots of haying coming up this summer.

House lilacs

We have a big "thing" happening in July. This old house has had 5 generations of our family born here, living their lives here and also dying here. We have a family cemetery in the back hayfield and have come to realize over the years that we have some friendly "folks" that still hang out at the farm even though they have passed away. We are being featured on an upcoming series My Ghost Story which premiers in July. We had a Hollywood producer come visit and take footage and everything. It is very exciting and very big happenings for this small town and certainly this family. More about that in the future. Thanks for stopping by! I hope to hear from some of you in the future!

s.m.r. saia
6/8/2010 5:57:22 AM

Wow, that's quite a place you have there! I look forward to hearing more about it.


oz girl
6/3/2010 9:48:49 AM

Love that beautiful farm house of yours! Just gorgeous. And my you've got quite a few hens, haven't you?? :-) Loved reading about your animal menagerie, and that surely is the most interesting adventure you've had, meeting with some Hollywood producers and all. I'll have to keep an eye out for that new show. We have 27 acres and a chicken coop, but no chickens. Yet. I'm looking forward to giving some hens a good home. And I'd definitely like to have a few guineas. I love watching my friend's guineas when I visit her. Welcome to the Grit blogging community! :-)


nebraska dave
6/3/2010 9:23:22 AM

Carmen, You have quite the menagerie of animals with interesting names. I bet they do keep you quite busy and entertained. I commend you for your horse rescues. I always thought if I had room and money for a horse I would have a draft horse. I once visited the stables of the Budweiser brewery. Those horses are huge. They stood six foot at the shoulder. From what I could see they were very gentle but looked to be a powerhouse of strength. Race horses on the other hand are a different story. I have a friend that raises Arabians and when he has to be gone for a few days I have the privilege of caring for the horses. They are a skittish horse to ride and definitely not a pleasure riding horse. They all do have their personalities and can be comical at times. Guineas are an interesting bird. My uncle had guineas on his farm which I spent summers living the farm life. I remember they would roost in the trees around the chicken house and make the loudest noise when predators or cars came down the lane. They were the greatest watch dogs ever. When they roosted inside the chicken house we always knew that bad weather was coming. How do they know these things? Welcome to Grit. I’m anticipating hearing more about your escapades in rural farm living.