Recipe Box: Cheesy Potatoes and More GRIT Staff Recipes

One or all of these dishes may just wind up on your dinner table time and time again.

Cheesy potatoes

These cheesy potatoes are just one of several tasty recipes compiled by the GRIT staff.

Photo by iStockphoto/Lauri Patterson

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Recipes from the GRIT Staff

Fireside Curry Shrimp Pizza Recipe
Beef Stoup Recipe
Old-Fashioned Chicken and Noodles Recipe
Khartoum Chicken Curry Recipe
Chocolate Sheath Cake Recipe
Cheesy Potatoes Recipe

Everyone has a favorite cookbook with one or more recipes that have become family favorites. Maybe it's a handwritten recipe card from Aunt Edna that has been pulled from the file more times than you can count. Both the book and the card have become worn, tattered and stained over the years, but that recipe is still a favorite for Saturday suppers or Sunday dinners.

The GRIT staff members are no different. We each have our favorites, and we would like to share them with you.

Editor-in-Chief Hank Will offers a fairly new recipe developed by his wife, Karen, and he says it has become one of his all-time favorites. Managing Editor Caleb Regan and his wife, Gwen, enjoy a beef dish they call "stoup," which is a combination of stew and soup.

Senior Associate Editor Traci Smith brings chicken and noodles to the table as often as possible, since it is, after all, a definite comfort food. Associate Editor Kellsey Trimble shares a chicken curry recipe from her grandmother that is one of her go-to dishes.

Editorial Assistant Ilene Reid offers a dessert recipe with an unusual name, which was passed down from the previous generation. Associate Editor Jean Teller shares the cheesy potatoes recipe that has found favor with her co-workers.

From our kitchens to yours, we hope these recipes make their way to your family's table as often as they find their way to ours.

If you have any favorites to share, email them – along with your name, full address and phone number, and a bit of history about the recipe – to jteller@grit.com. Who knows? Your recipe may be featured in a future issue.


Help Wanted

• Kelsi Stracener, Buna, Texas, remembers a blueberry tart with a flaky crust that was topped with some sort of cream. The dessert was easy to slice, and the berries didn't run.

Anyone have a favorite recipe for berries, any type of berry? Another type of tart? A cobbler, crisp, pie or muffins? A cake or ice cream topping?

• Karen Templeton, Lansdale, Pennsylvania, is looking for a recipe for Texas Hash. Her mother made it in the 1950s and later, and it contained ground beef, green peppers, tomatoes and rice. When it was finished baking, Karen says, it had a crispy and crunchy crust.

Do you have an old-fashioned recipe using ground beef? Perhaps one that contains rice? How do you like to cook green peppers and tomatoes?

• Sandy Keltner, Walnut Grove, Missouri, wants to know how to can green beans with garlic and onions, the way her grandmother did long ago.

What canning recipes would you like to share? Any others for green or other types of beans? Other veggies, or perhaps fruit?

• Faye Fees, Eden, South Dakota, hopes others will share their old-time sauerkraut recipes.

We’d also like to see your recipes for other fermented foods, such as pickles and other pickled foods, chow chow, relish, and other condiments.

• Hazel Stephens, Salyersville, Kentucky, would like an old recipe for egg custard.

Do you have other custard recipes? A favorite egg recipe? Quiche or cake?

• Bunny Kochis, Greensburg, Pennsylvania, was taught to make Southern cornbread by her grandmother. It was made with white cornmeal, flour and lard, and baked in a cast-iron skillet, but she's not sure of the other ingredients or the measurements. Her grandmother and mother hail from Pikeville, Tennessee.


If you’ve been looking for a long-lost recipe, or can provide one, please send an email to recipebox@grit.com, or write to Recipe Box, c/o Grit, 1503 S.W. 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609. Email is our preferred method of communication, and requests and submissions will be more likely to be answered in a timely fashion if sent electronically. Please include your name, full mailing address, and daytime phone number on all correspondence. Recipes cannot be returned; we will forward the first 10 recipes to the person who made the original request, and then file the rest for possible online or print publication. Addresses are not printed to allow us the opportunity to publish recipes before sending them on to the requesting party.