Grit Blogs > Thin Air Farmer

Corn Coming Out of My Ears

Heather ColwellThe moment gardeners wait for – and dread – has finally arrived! The sweet corn is ripe. Nothing beats the taste of corn on the cob. This year I have been removing the silk and most of the outer husks, soaking the ears in water and then grilling them. A little butter, salt and pepper and you have a delicacy. But, you can only eat so much corn in a day, so that means the extra needs to be preserved. So far I have been blanching, cutting off the corn kernels and freezing them. I think at last count I have 45 quart bags in the freezer and that has barely made a dent in what is in the garden. So, I think today I will do more freezing and also can some corn relish.

 corn relish
Corn Relish

The goats love all the cast-off husks. As soon as I head toward the garden they are at the fence impatiently waiting for a treat. The chickens also enjoy cleaning off what is left behind by my kitchen knife. Once corn season is over I will have to empty all the cobs from the chicken yard and put them out in the compost pile. That way we will have compost for the garden so we can grow more corn in the years to come.

Corn Relish

Yields about 6 pints

2 quarts cut cooked corn (about 18 ears)
1 quart chopped cabbage (about 1 small head)
1 cup chopped onion (about 1 medium)
1 cup chopped sweet green peppers (about 2 small)
1 cup chopped sweet red peppers (about 2 small)
1 to 2 cups of sugar
2 tablespoons dry mustard
1 tablespoon celery seed
1 tablespoon mustard seed
1 tablespoon salt
1 tablespoon turmeric
1 quart vinegar
1 cup water

Combine all ingredients in large pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat, and simmer for 20 minutes.

Pack hot relish into hot jars, leaving 1/4 inch of headspace. Remove air bubbles. Adjust 2-piece caps. Process for 15 minutes in boiling-water canner.

*This recipe came from Ball: Blue Book of Preserving

We eat this on hot dogs, sausages, or burgers. You can also eat it with corn chips as well.

Does anyone have any other recipes for large quantities of corn? Or, other ways that they preserve corn?

nebraskadave
9/12/2015 10:07:25 AM

Heather, welcome to the GRIT blogging community. I wish I had your problem. Since started gardening and trying to raise sweet corn four years ago, not a single ear of corn has reached my freezer. Before the corn reaches any where close to maturity, the marauding raccoons come and ravage the entire patch. I started building a six foot wooden fence three years ago and it's nearing completion. I've had a deer problem as well. The wooden fence will keep the deer out of the corn patch but folks tell me that raccoon can climb a wooden fence so inside the wooden fence will be a four foot chicken wire fence around the corn with three portable electric wires. In addition to that live traps baited with marshmallows will be set near the chicken wire fence. I'm hoping the multiple levels of security and traps will keep the corn safe from the marauding little buggers. ***** Have a great corn harvest preserving day.