Grit Blogs > Life on a Southern Farm

Thankful for Our Farm Life

A photo of GaFarm Woman PamThis summer has been very long, hot, and humid. At the end of another week of heat advisories for our area, another week of non-stop work, another week of a few set backs, we sometimes wonder why we keep doing what we do here on the farm. I understand that this way of life is not for everyone.(I really understand). It is hard work. It is the life my husband and I choose and at the moment I wouldn't trade it for anything else.

Here are a few of the reasons why:

Have you ever...

Been so thankful for life that you thought you would burst?

Planting in the field

Loved a goat...

Annie the goat

Or two?

Cuddling a goat

Have you ever...

Dried your clothes in fresh air and sunshine?

Clothes drying on the line

Built a boat?

Building a boat

Boat building

Smelled fresh cut hay?

Fresh-cut hay

Skinny dipped in a pond with your husband in the moonlight?

Lake for skinny dipping

Kissed a chicken?

Goat kissing a chicken

Just watched a cow graze?

Cow grazing

Have you ever...

Built a rock bridge from rocks on the farm?

Hand built rock bridge

And a water wheel?

Handmade water wheel

Made a bale of pine straw?

Baling a pine straw

Seen a snake in a tree?

Snake in a tree

Have you ever...

Been a young family and built your own home? together? three times? never worried about a mortgage? never ... ever?

Our family in 1984

New house

Worked the soil, grew, and preserved enough fruits and vegetables for a year?

Vegetables grown

Have you ever... been so thankful for life you thought you would burst?

Flying bird

Oh yes, I remember now!

Just a few reasons why we keep doing it all over and over again.

What are you thankful for this week?

Please visit us at our farm here: Life on a Southern Farm

jdlightner
4/11/2014 10:08:41 AM

Pam, I have been searching all over the web trying to get detailed instructions on making a "Pine Straw Box Baler." Could you send me detailed plans to make a solid pine straw baler? My wife and I would so grateful. J.D Lightner P.S Awesome site!


anniea
3/28/2014 9:37:11 PM

I love your blog, the comments and the pictures. It is the next thing to being there and I thank you. You and your husband live the perfect life to me.


bama_1
9/13/2010 3:06:08 PM

Pam, It's good to see a fellow southerner living our dream. We live in Deep South Alabama, and my wife and I are on our way to the debt-free, back to the basics lifestyle as well. We have a lot of learning to do when it comes to livestock. Our goal is a milk cow and chickens. We annually fill the freezer with enough deer meat and vegetables to last a year, but we would really like to have fresh eggs and milk. I see pictures of Jerseys. Does everyone on the farm like raw milk and are you able to earn a little pocket change from excess milk, butter or cheese? We're researching ways to add a little income on the farm.


carmen_2
9/11/2010 5:51:54 PM

Hi Pam... OK, so being from Maine, I almost FREAKED when I saw that GINORMOUS snake in a TREE...AHHHHH!! I dont mind them A) smaller and B) on the ground where they belong..what kind of varmint is that, and are they always that HUGE?? We have very few snakes, and none that big, I dont think..Milk and brown snakes are about as big as we get and it didnt compare to that thing...Very nice post..thanks for sharing...Carmen from Homeland Farm


pam_6
8/30/2010 12:00:42 PM

Nebraska Dave, You certainly have enjoyed life! I admire the way you take time to help others in different areas. It must be exciting to had the opportunity to visit so many places. And..family is the icing on the cake. Thanks for the comment. Pam


pam_6
8/30/2010 11:51:30 AM

Hey Cindy, I gather..you don't like snakes in trees? lol.. I remember when I was little and playing in the creek. There were always snakes hanging in the trees! I guess growing up with snakes everywhere came in handy years and years later. I don't enjoy snakes but we have an understanding. I don't bother them (most of the time) and they don't bother me. thanks for the comment.


nebraska dave
8/27/2010 3:06:09 PM

@Pam, I haven’t kissed a chicken, built a boat, skinny dipped with anyone in a pond, built a rock bridge or water wheel, nor have I baled pine straw, or lived in a house without a mortgage. I have however, loved a goat or two, played with rabbits, touched snakes, watched cows graze, smelled fresh cut alfalfa, and smelled the freshness from clothes dried on the outside line, tilled the soil, harvested vegetables, canned and froze the harvest. I have picked wild back berries, road side elder berries, sampled persimmons, and found wild asparagus. And yes I’ve even held a wild skunk by the tail in the back woods of Missouri. I’ve rode horses, tractors, motorcycles, four wheelers, bicycles, go carts, mini bikes, and pogo sticks. I’ve fished the waters of many lakes and rivers across the United States as well as Canada, Pacific Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, and Gulf of Mexico. I’ve had the privilege to visit 9 other countries beside the U.S. I’ve been blessed with three children and six grandchildren. So if you are asking, have I ever been so thankful that I thought I would burst, the answer would be definitely yes many times over. Have a great thankful Georgia farm day.


cindy murphy
8/26/2010 10:30:43 PM

Hi, Pam. Gorgeous photos! It's all very beautiful there on your farm...except the snakes; I could do without the snakes. On the ground, well, okay. Hanging above my head, in a tree - no!!! (shudder) I'd run across a black rat snake out on the trail here every so often, and that was fine - they're quite big and very beautiful. And then I learned they are often found in trees. ACK! For a while afterward, every loose bare branch in a tree suddenly looked like a black rat snake about to drop on my head as I passed underneath. I'm thankful that never happened! I think I'm past that irrational fear now....until I actually see one in a tree! Thanks for sharing your life on a Southern farm.


pam_6
8/24/2010 5:35:18 PM

Hi Kathy, It is Miracle Eve(my bottle baby) in my lap. She is still very spoiled to this day. The newest goat was a buck and he is 2 months old now. He has grown so much. I need to make new pictures of them all. I am excited for you on your move to the country. It will not only be an adventure but a new way of life. Good luck with it all. Thanks for taking time to comment. Pam


pam_6
8/24/2010 5:32:24 PM

Thank-you MountainWoman. I can tell by your posts and photos of your farm that you are thankful for your life, also. It is a great feeling, isn't it?! Just a few moments a day to find at least 1 thing to be thankful for, can do wonders for anyone..inside and out. Have a great day. Pam


kathy in ky
8/24/2010 4:46:31 PM

Hi Miss Pam - I was fortunate enough to see these photos for the first time on your wonderful blog,and it's great to see them again. Is that Miracle Eve in your lap? And how is your new goat baby doing - wasn't he a buckling? I can't remember for the life of me. I am thankful for so many things and one main thing is that I am thankful for all of the women I've gotten to know in blog-land, including you. You are all an inspiration to me,and have shared my dream of living off of the land. I have lived vicariously thru you all, and now get to get my feet wet myself, soon. My best to you and your FarmMan, from Fayette Co KY, soon to be Casey Co KY.


mountain woman
8/24/2010 2:13:32 PM

Pam, I love your farm photos. It's so incredibly beautiful there but also what makes it beautiful is your heart and your love for life. I would have to say I'm thankful for everything in my life and there is not a day that goes past that I don't thank God for it all. Thanks for such a lovely post.