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DIY Deodorant

Kate MarloweI won’t bore you with the reasons for using a natural deodorant, there are plenty of sites already covering this. I'm not a medical professional and am not making medical claims. Most of us are aware of the dangers of aluminum and that using a natural deodorant eliminates these concerns. The problem is, natural deodorants fall into two categories for me: They don’t work or they cause significant skin irritation. I have finally dabbled with various DIY methods and concocted my own recipe that works; the best part is the fragrance works for me and other women!

Natural Deodorant

The primary ingredient is coconut oil. I have found many of the health benefits found in headlines to be true. For the case of deodorant, it is non-irritating to the skin and has an antibacterial effect that helps the deodorant keep you smelling fresh. The oil has a low melting point so even in colder climates it melts and absorbs in to the skin quickly. You will find a variation in how hard or soft your deodorant is depending on how cool of an area you store it. Mine is in the bathroom cabinet and is soft in the summer, firm in the winter.

Ylang YlangThe oil you add for fragrance is up to you. I like the DoTERRA Ylang Ylang as it is known to be a relaxing fragrance and I find it to be appealing for a man or woman. It’s said to have a bit of aphrodisiac quality but that is for you to decide!

Fragrances that also work well and have additional antibacterial qualities include Jasmine, lavender, frankincense and melaleuca. You can also adjust the amount of drops you use, I find four to six drops works well for a light fragrance that’s not overpowering.

Now for the recipe!

6 to 7 tablespoons coconut oil
1/4 cup baking soda
2 tablespoons arrowroot powder
2 tablespoons cornstarch
4 to 6 drops Ylang Ylang (or preferred scent)

I use a larger bowl to mix the ingredients; you can also mix the powders together first and add the coconut oil until it’s well blended. I store mine in a small glass jar; depending on your climate, you can re-use an old deodorant stick. The summer is too warm for me to do this since the deodorant is quite a bit softer.

Make-up sponges work best for application. You can re-use them and just store it in the deodorant jar. Options that also work include a tissue, cotton ball or just use your fingers. The leftover deodorant on your hand easily rubs in as a moisturizer.