Grit Blogs > News From Razor Family Farms

Pure and Simple

By Lacy Razor 


Tags: ,

We are located in Harris County, Georgia. Josh is stationed at Ft. Benning, and we live about half an hour north of Post (and a mile from the Chattahoochee River) on three acres. We have chickens, guinea fowl, turkeys and ducks. Soon we'll have dairy goats. We also have a small organic garden. Of course, simple living is less about what you have and more about what you do with what you have. We spend a lot of our time trying to figure out ways to cut costs by making things ourselves and then putting those plans into action. This means that we are often rendering fat to make soap, building with recycled wood, and other strange activities. We are delighted to represent our corner of the deep south. We’d like to begin with something Lacy wrote back in April.

In the name of all things good and holy, where did our time and money go?

How often have I asked that very question?

Choosing a simplified life does not lengthen the day or make the world instantly bend your way. In fact, as we contemplate why the government doesn’t allow private citizens to install their own solar-energy system and fails to regulate the excessive installation fees … we feel the ugly shadow of discouragement creep over us. Then our bank account fails to produce the necessary funds to support our other inspired ideas or the tools to complete a project. Unfailingly, it is in these moments that we are reminded that our choice to pursue this lifestyle is morally on target. We are then given the chance to see the rewards of our labors and the lighter side of life…

Josh Hunting

A few months ago, I was busily researching how to convert a broken refrigerator into a large incubator for eggs because I have grand ideas of hatching eggs and selling chicks without spending a ghastly amount of money on an industrial incubator. As I scribbled notes on using bathroom fans near the thermostat and the joys of tilting trays, I heard Josh walking very quickly through the house and peeked just in time to see him step out on the front porch with a gun. He told me later that he had a sixth-sense moment so he grabbed his gun like a good soldier and went to save the day. I stalked him with camera in hand, hoping for action.

The simple life just went from frustrating to exciting. Three of our guineas were running in circles, sometimes running smack into each other — like heated up atoms. Josh raced ahead to the fence in the front lot. He stopped and took aim. It was then that I saw the flash of movement through the fence coming from our yard. Josh lowered his rifle but remained on alert.

The guineas raced past Josh, and he followed them. I carefully tiptoed along behind the group making as much noise as was humanly possible. Josh bent down. I prayed silently: “Oh no. Please, God, not more death!” The guineas were making horrible sounds. I glanced over in time to see the fourth guinea race over to join the group. Josh waved me over to see.

Sixteen guinea eggs had been guarded by mother guinea against a creeping fox who managed to avoid Josh’s expert superhuman sniper powers by aligning him/herself with the neighbor’s propane tank.

Suddenly all the red tape, lack of funds, and bureaucratic baloney all vanished … the only thingGuinea Fowl Nest in the world was my wonderful husband holding my hand as we stood over a nest of potential life. We were in awe of the boldness & bravery of our little guinea hen who protected her nest from a daunting predator. Fearless in the face of overwhelming odds, she held her ground until the fox was long gone.

This is what choosing the simple life does to you: The very moment you doubt your purpose or consider the obstacles insurmountable, some extraordinary force reins you back in. You find yourself centered and motivated. Suddenly the sacrifices seem minor and of little consequence. Making homemade soap, clothing and bread; gardening and canning; keeping poultry and collecting eggs; knitting, spinning, quilting and darning socks; and all the million-and-one ways of simplifying life are not only worthwhile — they are vital, renewable energy for the soul.

Please visit the Razor Family Farms Web site.

marlene_1
8/6/2008 4:15:16 PM

Dear Lacy, I stumbled onto your story on simple living. Yes where does the money go that we work so hard for? Why is it that the rich get richer and the poor get poorer. If we go for a country drive then after about an hour you can feel the tention going out of your body. Nothing can bring you to reality than either living in the country or seeing the country going out for drives. Now with the price of gas (Canada where I live is $1.34.9 a litre not a gallon) it will be fewer trips to the country. When I saw this post I was so happy to be reminded of what it was like living in the country. I used to live in the country but am living in the city trying to save some extra money to buy some land again and move back. Your writing is such an inspiration to me and no doubt to many others. Especially those who will always live in the city because they have no choice. Please continue to write. You are a blessing in disguise to all. THANKS AGAIN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


paulette
8/6/2008 2:35:28 PM

Lacy, it's so great to see you here! Your posts are so refreshing, I always look forward to checking in each day and getting the 'Lacy perspective'. I love how you are determined to live your life. It isn't always easy, but it's always worth it. As I prepare to live my dream in the country, you are quite the inspiration. Keep it up.


robin_1
8/2/2008 9:44:37 PM

Dear Lacy, The most creative thing I can think of is the use of free cinder blocks to surround the first 50 feet or so of our gardens. They are excellent for retaining lovely garden dirt, which in turn holds lovely organic veggies. Organic gardening ROCKS! Take care, Robin Stokes


robin_1
8/2/2008 9:40:47 PM

Dear Lacy, The most creative thing I can think of is the use of free cinder blocks to surround the first 50 feet or so of our gardens. I found them over a period of years before we began our large gardens. They are excellent for retaining lovely garden dirt, which in turn holds lovely organic veggies. Organic gardening ROCKS! Take care, Robin Stokes


robin_1
8/2/2008 9:38:01 PM

Dear Lacy, The most creative thing I can think of is the use of free cinder blocks to surround the first 50 feet or so of our gardens. They are excellent for retaining lovely garden dirt, which in turn holds lovely organic veggies. Organic gardening ROCKS! Take care, Robin Stokes


dawn_1
8/2/2008 4:01:18 PM

We try to live the simple life as well. It is a rather funny saying in reality. There is nothing simple about it. It takes true GRIT to do the things that need to be done, to face the foe, to encourage our livestock and our garden to grow. It is a lifestyle full of challenges, but despite the challenges or it is probably because of the challenges, life is so rewarding. The richness of experience with the savoury gleanings from a hard days work cannot be topped by a life in the corporate world where one becomes exhausted and doesn't know why and where the flavours run together in sameness. I love the simple life and thedaily rewards it offers. Thanks Lacy for your ideas and inspiration. I love the way your write your adventures in simple living. Keep up the great work.


julie at elisharose
8/1/2008 10:35:55 PM

You live in Harris county? I live in Harris County! OK, I'm in Texas, but still! How fun. Wonderful story. Great slice of your life. Thanks so much for sharing.


katy
8/1/2008 8:29:42 PM

You and your little life have truly inspired me Lacy! I feel so blessed that I have you and Josh in my life to help our little family find ways to green up and simplify our lives, and to be part of that ever important village that so enhances proper child-rearing. (And what adorable rears they do have!) I have often questioned the point of attempting to make all of these changes. Today especially tho, I feel that we are on the right path regardless of how futile (or perhaps feudal) it sometimes seems. The whole world is opened up to me today just waiting to give me the opportunity to do the right thing.


farmnwfie
8/1/2008 2:03:11 PM

Congrats on your new position. It is very exciting to start on a new adventure. You never know what it will lead to next. farmnwife


carl martens
8/1/2008 12:33:18 PM

"...not more death" I got chills reading how Josh's soldier instincts took over him! This is an excellent post depicting why you have chosen the simple life. It is something that I'm sure many people would love to do, but many find the courage to take on. I applaud you both for doing so. When I find the time to read your posts I always get a good warm fuzzy feeling after reading...keep up with your adventures!


tipper
8/1/2008 8:24:26 AM

Nothing like a momma protecting her babies. Great post topic-with really great writing!


yeongshe davis
8/1/2008 7:10:18 AM

We asked ourselves "where did our money and time go?" all the time. Sometimes it's so tough to do what you love and at the same time having enough funds to support what you love to do. Congrats on your new gig!


holly, the knitter
7/31/2008 8:02:56 PM

Yea, Lacy! I'm so proud of you and your new writing gig. I'm excited that more people than ever will read the adventures of Josh and Lacy on their little farm in West Central Georgia. You tell great stories and now the WHOLE WORLD will hear. Love ya. See you soon. - Holly


paula niz
7/31/2008 7:45:41 PM

I was grinning to myself as I pictured you stalking your soldier and hens with your camera. Too funny! I was raised on a farm and have big plans to be a farmgirl agasin someday soon. Live is never dull in the country, is it?


crossview
7/31/2008 7:41:51 PM

It's so wonderful to read about those who "get it". The more we do, the more we want to try. It's such a satisfying lifestyle and it's amazing how much joy and peace there is in the little things...


christina
7/31/2008 7:15:48 PM

Congratulations, Lacy, on the new writing gig..... You are always a favorite of mine. I thoroughly enjoy reading your perspectives. Simple living is, indeed, a state of mind. You can only do what you can do. You need to eat. It doesn't take alot of space to grow food for a family. We have gardening organically for 3 years now. We have progressed from eating what is in season to preserving for the winter. We got our first food dryer: this year we intend to preserve by drying as we do not have the space to can or freeze much. We also aquired 9 lovely little chicks; we ended up with 1 rooster and 8 hens. We are looking forward to eggs soon... Thank you again. You are truly an inspiration. Christina from CoffeeCoffeeCoffee in Four Oaks NC.


sheri schluter
7/31/2008 6:14:55 PM

As usual, a well written, factual, comical and insightful look at Lacy and Josh's life as they know it. Two people looking to make the world a better place and being kind enough to take us followers along for the ride. Lacy's honest and entertaining entries are are a must have for me every night.


the cotton wife
7/31/2008 4:38:02 PM

"Where did our time and money go??" I ask myself that all the time. Even though we lead a slow-paced life we're so doggone happy about it that the days fly by. As for money? I think leprachauns come and take it at night. I have no other plausible explanation. Girls don't come any more frugal than me - but my money never sticks around!


julie muytoy
7/31/2008 1:25:15 PM

The simplified life, that's what I long for. Living on farmland growing up was a wonderful thing. Being surrounded by corn and wheat fields, animals of all sorts, and God's glorious creation called nature. Every summer I drive the country roads looking for that special tomato stand to become a loyal patron too. From the time I was 9years old until I was 13 and we moved; every summer we bought the best large red ripe tomatoes you ever saw from the stand down the road. A stand owned by a gentleman who had a garden in his back yard. I can still picture those tomatoes in my mind and remember their glorious taste as one slice covered a whole slice of bread! Scruptious is the word! So, now when my husband and I went house hunting, we visited the small communities in the county. I am proud to say we own an acre and even though it is not a farm we are in walking distance of wide open fields.


hank will_2
7/31/2008 8:32:13 AM

Lacy and Josh -- This is a wonderful story. There is something compelling about a mother's tenacity when it comes to her nest. We lost quite a few chickens to red fox many years ago now. I couldn't figure out how it was happening since I had them penned up at night inside an electric net fence. I was using the cattle barn for one wall of their pen. One day, I startled a fox, with a chicken, inside the barn. The fox were accessing the chicken pen through a broken window above the feed bunk. I am still amazed that they could jump out of the pen and through the window carrying a chicken.