Grit Blogs > The Call of the Land

Climate Change, Food Costs and Civic Courage

ffDrought is igniting Russia, and floods of ‘mind-blowing’ proportion are drowning Pakistan. Dry or wet, unstable climate conditions are wreaking havoc on people’s lives and their crops – not just in those two locales, but in many places around the world as well.

Meanwhile, speculators – not just the usual commodity investors, but big money players – are driving up the cost of food by injecting money into national and international  markets in ways intended to make profits for themselves. But those monetary moves on the part of financiers are a major factor driving up the prices in supermarkets for people who just want to eat.

It is in this context that the Millennial Agrarians are coming forward with their solutions, producing clean food and healing the land. They are imbued with civic courage. In general, civic courage is a term characterizing the soul state of civilians who confront the problems of the world and advance solutions.

With their work on the land – in cities, suburbs and countryside, the Millennial Agrarians are demonstrating both foresight and civic courage. Many of these civic pioneers, and the models they are establishing, are profiled in my book The Call of the Land,  The book is for everyone who aspires to act wisely and courageously. It shows dozens and dozens of sensible, practical,  positive pathways forward in a time of profound uncertainty.

Among the many possibilities, CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) continues to prove itself as a particularly valuable form for these Millennial Agrarians to exercise their will, skill, and determination. Over the course of 2010, news stories  from around North America reported on steady growth and development in the CSA model and its variations. The Seattle Post Intelligencer ran one such story a few weeks back, and reported that there are by now well over 12,500 CSA farms spread across the country.

As the economy and the environment wobble precariously, these farms — and the hundreds of other new agrarian initiatives taking root — are demonstrating the foundation of a path to a clean and sustainable future.

steven mcfadden_1
8/30/2010 9:42:00 AM

You are welcome, Dave. And thanks so much for sharing the story of Greensburg. If they can do it, then it can be done far and wide. Go Huskers!


nebraska dave
8/29/2010 12:13:25 PM

@Steven, Hello fellow Nebraskan. Some years ago there was a class five tornado that tore through the little town of Greensburg Kansas. Practically all the town was demolished by the historic event. When the town’s people began to rebuild, they decided that only Green technology would be used to rebuild businesses, schools, and homes. I am proud to say that I was one of the volunteers to help with the rebuilding of the city. It has a special place in my heart every time I think about the time spent there rebuilding with green technology. The house that I worked on had special walls that were built out of foam insulation that was filled with reinforced concrete. I’m not sure about what the R value was but it had to be more than a conventional house with 2X4 walls. Many of the houses around the one I help to work on were window conscientious and solar rich. This year the new school opened. It is an amazing thing what the people of Greensburg have done from the ruins of the cataclysmic tornado that devastated the town. This town made a difference in the global climate by rebuilding from the ground up with modern ideas and available technology. It couldn’t have happened without many things coming in unity in the physical, emotional, and spiritual. Thanks for another great article of the global climate change world view.