Grit Blogs > Life and Adventures at Diamond W Ranch

Anatolian Shepherd Puppies

By Jacqueline Wilt, R.N., C.E.M.T.


Tags: dog, anatolian shepherd, livestock, guardian, kansas, farm dogs, puppies, poultry, Jackie Wilt, Jacqueline Wilt,

Life and Adventures at Diamond W RanchWe have puppies! My Anatolian Shepherd dogs Brina and Silas are the proud parents of TEN beautiful, roly-poly balls of cute. They are, as of this writing, about 5-1/2 weeks old.

The puppies were whelped in a converted goat kidding stall in my old barn. There are two stalls side-by-side with a plywood partition between them that was in two pieces. I removed the top piece, leaving a section about 2 feet high that Brina could easily jump over. The puppies were on one side, and the other side was for Brina to be able to get away from them to eat and such. Just last week, they had gotten too big for that stall. So, I moved them across the barnyard to a fenced-in area with a small shed.

This fenced in area was previously used to house weanling goat kids. I have not had goats for some time now, and the pen had become overgrown with weeds.

Pen before clearing the weeds

The weeds were cleared by hand, by yours truly … I am still sore!

Pen after clearing the weeds

Since it is winter, and I live in Kansas where the weather can change in the blink of an eye, I plied the little shed with an entire bale of straw to make sure the puppies had a warm nest. More straw bales were placed along the sides of the shed to protect it from wind, and the windows were covered with plastic. After all that, the puppies prefer to bed down under the shed. Guess they know what is warmest.

Most of the puppies have already been spoken for and will go to their new homes in January. Anatolian Shepherds are in high demand as livestock guardians, and for good reason. They are very good at it. Mine are great with my poultry and sheep. Without them I wouldn’t be able to have poultry at all. Predators such as coyotes and owls have, in the past, wiped out any attempts at raising them.

These puppies are being raised with chickens, ducks, sheep, horses, other dogs and lots of socialization with people.

Learning to guard chickens

They will, I am certain, make fine guardians as well.

cherylaker
12/28/2015 3:56:30 PM

Beautiful pups! And I can sure relate to being sore after pulling a tons of weeds! lol All our dogs are "fur kids" and live in the house. A livestock guardian dog would be wonderful, but I don't know how I could leave one outside and have the others inside! :) Cheryl @ Pasture Deficit Disorder