Grit Blogs > Transitional Traditions

Dairy Farming: A Significant Morning

Becky, Andy, and EllyIt's 5 am. As I sit here with Ethan in my arms, I know today is special. There is the fact that today is forecast to be 80+ degrees when the surrounding days won't even reach 60. Then, when I stepped outside briefly to see if the thermometer really was reading 50 degrees at 5 am, I heard Reinhold our rooster in mid-crow, announcing the morning to the farmstead. Even more dramatic was the fact that off in the distance, I heard the distinct gobbling of the male turkeys in our neighborhood announcing the same thing. The birds were awake and praising the morning promise, and all around, a sort of pregnancy of anticipation could be felt.

And then I came to it; the reason today stood out for me above all else:

In the midst of the darkness of dawn, the barn lights were on.

I feel my heart leap with excitement. Has it really been that long? Yes, nearly 13 years to the day since the early farm morning was illuminated by those soft squares of light, the old dairy barn is once again animated with life and promise. I can't believe I am affected like this! I had no idea I had missed that part of the farm so much!

Andrew is in that very barn, milking our very first cow, beginning the day with a “chore” that we have been dreaming about for two full years. Today, a big part of our dreams have come to fruition.

This farm is a dairy again.

Early morning dairy barn


Rebekah Sell lives on a small plot of land with her husband, Andy, on which they are hoping to build a sustainable homestead. With a small business and four kids, life is always interesting as Becky and Andy live fully the idea that the journey is the reward. Find her on .